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MULTIMODAL IMAGING OF EARLY STAGE 1 TYPE 3 NEOVASCULARIZATION WITH SIMULTANEOUS EYE-TRACKED SPECTRAL-DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY AND HIGH-SPEED REAL-TIME ANGIOGRAPHY

Querques, Giuseppe MD, PhD*; Souied, Eric H. MD, PhD*; Freund, K. Bailey MD†,‡

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0b013e3182923448
Original Study

Purpose: To analyze the multimodal imaging features of eyes with early Type 3 neovascularization showing primarily intraretinal proliferation without evidence of choroidal involvement.

Methods: The multimodal imaging data for a consecutive series of patients with new onset stage 1 Type 3 neovascularization were reviewed and the changes at the site of early lesion development were analyzed.

Results: Nineteen eyes of 19 patients (12 women, mean age 79.9 ± 6.3 years) were included for analysis. Both fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography showed a focal hyperfluorescence corresponding to the intraretinal vascular complex (early Type 3 neovascularization) and disclosed a single retinal arteriole feeding this lesion. There was no angiographic evidence of a retinal–choroidal anastomosis or underlying Type 1 or Type 2 neovascularization. In all study eyes, eye-tracked spectral-domain optical coherence tomography showed the intraretinal neovascular complex as a hyperreflective lesion located in the outer retina, which appeared adherent to the underlying retinal pigment epithelium. In all eyes, there seemed to be a focal discontinuity of the retinal pigment epithelium band through which the hyperreflective intraretinal lesions communicated with the underlying material of medium reflectivity within drusen or drusenoid pigment epithelium detachment. With spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, clear evidence of a communication with the choroid was not detected.

Conclusion: Multimodal imaging seems to support available clinicopathologic findings showing primarily intraretinal proliferation and anastomoses between retinal vessels and evolving Type 1 (subretinal pigment epithelium) neovascular tissue within underlying drusen or drusenoid pigment epithelium detachments without evidence of anastomoses with the choroidal circulation.

Multimodal imaging in the early stages of Type 3 neovascularization suggests that, in some eyes, the retinal circulation and outer retina are the primary sites of involvement. These findings support available clinicopathologic findings showing primarily intraretinal proliferation and anastomoses between retinal vessels and evolving Type 1 neovascular tissue within underlying drusen or drusenoid pigment epithelium detachments without evidence of anastomoses with the choroidal circulation.

*Department of Ophthalmology, University Paris Est Creteil, Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal de Creteil, Creteil, France;

Vitreous Retina Macula Consultants of New York, New York, New York; and

Department of Ophthalmology, New York University, New York, New York.

Reprint requests: Giuseppe Querques, MD, PhD, Department of Ophthalmology, University Paris Est Creteil, Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal de Creteil, 40 Avenue de Verdun, 94000 Creteil, France; e-mail: giuseppe.querques@hotmail.it

Supported in part by The Macula Foundation, Inc.

None of the authors have any financial/conflicting interests to disclose.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (www.retinajournal.com).

© 2013 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.