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CURRENT KNOWLEDGE AND TRENDS IN AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION: Todays and Future Treatments

Velez-Montoya, Raul MD*; Oliver, Scott C. N. MD*; Olson, Jeffrey L. MD*; Fine, Stuart L. MD*; Mandava, Naresh MD*; Quiroz-Mercado, Hugo MD

Retina:
doi: 10.1097/IAE.0b013e318271f265
Review
Abstract

Purpose: To address the most dynamic and current issues concerning today’s treatment options and promising research efforts regarding treatment for age-related macular degeneration. This review is aimed to serve as a practical reference for more in-depth reviews on the subject.

Methods: An online review of the database PubMed and Ovid were performed, searching for the key words age-related macular degeneration, AMD, VEGF, treatment, PDT, steroids, bevacizumab, ranibizumab, VEGF-trap, radiation, combined therapy, as well as their compound phrases. The search was limited to articles published since 1985. All returned articles were carefully screened, and their references were manually reviewed for additional relevant data. The web page www.clinicaltrials.gov was also accessed in search of relevant research trials.

Results: A total of 363 articles were reviewed, including 64 additional articles extracted from the references. At the end, only 160 references were included in this review.

Conclusion: Treatment for age-related macular degeneration is a very dynamic research field. While current treatments are mainly aimed at blocking vascular endothelial growth factor, future treatments seek to prevent vision loss because of scarring. Promising efforts have been made to address the dry form of the disease, which has lacked effective treatment.

In Brief

Treatment for age-related macular degeneration is a very dynamic research field. While current treatments are mainly aimed at blocking vascular endothelial growth factor, future treatments seek to prevent vision loss because of scarring. Promising efforts have been made to address the dry form of the disease, which has lacked effective treatment.

Author Information

*Department of Ophthalmology, University of Colorado Health and Science Center, Rocky Mountain Lions Eye Institute, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado

Department of Ophthalmology, Denver Health Medical Center, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, Colorado.

Reprint requests: Raul Velez-Montoya, MD, 1675 Aurora Court, Aurora CO 80045; e-mail: raul.velez-montoya@ucdenver.edu

S.C.N. Oliver, J.L. Olson, and N. Mandava received research support from Genetech, Ophthotech, and Thrombogenics. S.L. Fine received research support from the National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health.

R. Velez-Montoya and H. Quiroz-Mercado do not have any economic, proprietary, or financial interest to disclose in the publication of this article.

© 2013 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.