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A MODIFIED ULTRASOUND-GUIDED SURGICAL TECHNIQUE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF THE UVEAL EFFUSION SYNDROME IN PATIENTS WITH NORMAL AXIAL LENGTH AND SCLERAL THICKNESS

Ghazi, Nicola G. MD*; Richards, Charles P. MD*,†; Abazari, Azin MD*

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0b013e3182790eb8
Original Studies

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe a modified surgical technique for the management of the uveal effusion syndrome (UES).

Methods: A consecutive interventional case series of six eyes with UES is reported. The diagnosis of the UES was based on detailed ophthalmic examination, fluorescein angiography, B-scan ultrasonography, biometry, and magnetic resonance imaging. All eyes underwent an ultrasound-guided placement of the sclerostomies subjacent to the area of maximal choroidal swelling using a scleral punch without scleral flaps or vortex vein decompression.

Results: All patients were men with a mean age of 53 years. The mean postoperative follow-up was 16.25 months. Five eyes had normal axial lengths (22.54–23.05 mm) by ultrasound and normal sclera thickness on magnetic resonance imaging. One eye had a shorter axial length (21.65 mm) and mild scleral thickening on magnetic resonance imaging. All six eyes had anterior peripheral choroidal swelling. Three eyes had associated serous retinal detachment, and three eyes had acute appositional angles. After surgery, five eyes had total resolution of the peripheral choroidal swelling and retinal detachment or normalization of the angle. One eye had partial resolution of the retinal detachment. Of the three eyes with retinal detachment, two eyes experienced improvement in visual acuity after surgery. No complications were noted.

Conclusion: This modified ultrasound-guided surgical technique for sclerostomy placement seems to be effective in the management of the UES, including eyes with normal axial length and scleral thickness, a subset of the UES that has been previously reported not to respond to surgery.

Ultrasound-guided placement of sclerostomies using a scleral punch seems to be effective in the management of the idiopathic uveal effusion syndrome in eyes with normal axial length and scleral thickness.

*Department of Ophthalmology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia

Department of Ophthalmology, Wake Forest University Eye Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Dr. Ghazi is now with the King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Dr. Abazari is now with the Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York.

Reprint requests: Nicola G. Ghazi, MD, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, PO Box 7191, Riyadh 11462, Saudi Arabia; e-mail: nicola.ghazi@lau.edu

None of the authors have any financial/conflicting interests to disclose.

Some of the data in this paper were presented as a poster at the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology annual meeting, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 2010.

© 2013 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.