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INTRAVITREAL BEVACIZUMAB IN THE TREATMENT OF DIABETIC OCULAR NEOVASCULARIZATION

Ababneh, Osama H. MD; Yousef, Yacoub A. MD; Gharaibeh, Almutez M. MD; Abu Ameerh, Mohammed A. MD; Abu-Yaghi, Nakhleh E. MD; Al Bdour, Muawyah D. MD

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0b013e3182721153
Original Study

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of intravitreal bevacizumab for treating diabetic retinal and/or iris neovascularization.

Methods: Consecutive, prospective, interventional case series study of 60 eyes with diabetic retinal and/or iris neovascularization. Patients had a complete ocular examination before receiving 1.25 mg (0.05 mL) of intravitreal bevacizumab. Abnormal new vessels elsewhere in the retina, optic disk, or iris were graded by size and associated hemorrhage or glaucoma. Patients had complete postinjection ophthalmic evaluations with regrading of the abnormal new vessels at 3 months and 6 months. The main outcome measures included clinical partial or total regression of abnormal new vessels, changes in visual acuity, and complications related to the intravitreal injections.

Results: Twenty-six patients (47.3%) were men (mean age, 59 years). Abnormal new vessel regression at 6 months occurred in 65% of new vessels of the iris (P = 0.001), 45% of new vessels of the optic disk (P = 0.009), and 43% of new vessels elsewhere (P = 0.008). The visual acuity improved in 20% of eyes, which was not significant (P = 0.235); the visual acuity deteriorated in 23% of eyes (P = 0.163). No systemic or ocular side effects developed except for postinjection hypotony in one eye.

Conclusion: Intravitreal bevacizumab is a well-tolerated medication that causes regression of abnormal diabetic neovascularization. New vessels of the iris responded more than new vessels of the optic disk and new vessels elsewhere.

Intravitreal bevacizumab can be used to treat abnormal diabetic neovascularization. New vessels of the iris respond better to intravitreal bevacizumab than new vessels of the disk or new vessels elsewhere in the retina. Early retinal or iris neovascularization respond better than advanced proliferation.

Ophthalmology Department, Jordan University Hospital, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan.

Reprint requests: Osama H. Ababneh, MD, PO Box 592, Tareq, Amman 11947, Jordan; e-mail: Ababneh99@yahoo.com

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

© The Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.