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INTRAVITREAL BEVACIZUMAB TREATMENT FOR EXUDATIVE AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION WITH GOOD VISUAL ACUITY

Axer-Siegel, Ruth MD*,†; Bor, Elite MD*,†; Bourla, Dan H. MD*; Weinberger, Dov MD*,†; Mimouni, Karin MD*,†

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0b013e31825db771
Original Study

Purpose: To investigate the effect of intravitreal bevacizumab on the visual and anatomic outcome of patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration presenting with good visual acuity (VA).

Methods: A file review was performed for all consecutive patients with newly diagnosed exudative age-related macular degeneration and initial VA of ≥20/40 treated in 2005 to 2010 and followed for at least 6 months. Treatment consisted of 3 loading doses of intravitreal bevacizumab every 6 weeks and was repeated when fluid or hemorrhage was present.

Results: The cohort included 130 patients (150 eyes). Mean follow-up was 20.2 ± 13.2 months, and mean number of injections was 11.3 ± 6.2. At the last examination, VA was stable or improved in 106 eyes (70.7%); 11 eyes (7.3%) lost ≥3 lines. Mean logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution VA measured 0.22 ± 0.1 (0–0.3) at presentation and 0.22 ± 0.2 (0–1.3) at the last visit. Corresponding values for central macular thickness were 267 ± 75 μm (137–562) and 226 ± 75 μm (75–568) (P = 0.14). The most frequent complication (18 eyes, 12%) was corneal epithelial defects.

Conclusion: Prompt intravitreal bevacizumab treatment for newly diagnosed exudative age-related macular degeneration in patients with good initial best-corrected visual acuity is associated with sustained or improved vision and a good safety profile. Attempts should be made to expedite the access of these patients to treatment, regardless of initial VA.

Prompt intravitreous bevacizumab treatment for newly diagnosed exudative age-related macular degeneration in patients with good initial visual acuity (≥20/40) is associated with sustained or improved vision and a good safety profile.

*Department of Ophthalmology, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Campus, Petach Tikva, Israel

Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

Reprint requests: Ruth Axer-Siegel, MD, Department of Ophthalmology, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Campus, 39 Jabotinski Street, Petach Tikva 49100, Israel; e-mail: seegs@netvision.co.il

The authors have no financial/conflicts of interest to disclose.

R. Axer-Siegel and E. Bor contributed equally to this article as first authors.

© The Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.