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INTRAVITREAL BEVACIZUMAB TREATMENT FOR EXUDATIVE AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION WITH GOOD VISUAL ACUITY

Axer-Siegel, Ruth MD*,†; Bor, Elite MD*,†; Bourla, Dan H. MD*; Weinberger, Dov MD*,†; Mimouni, Karin MD*,†

Retina:
doi: 10.1097/IAE.0b013e31825db771
Original Study
Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the effect of intravitreal bevacizumab on the visual and anatomic outcome of patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration presenting with good visual acuity (VA).

Methods: A file review was performed for all consecutive patients with newly diagnosed exudative age-related macular degeneration and initial VA of ≥20/40 treated in 2005 to 2010 and followed for at least 6 months. Treatment consisted of 3 loading doses of intravitreal bevacizumab every 6 weeks and was repeated when fluid or hemorrhage was present.

Results: The cohort included 130 patients (150 eyes). Mean follow-up was 20.2 ± 13.2 months, and mean number of injections was 11.3 ± 6.2. At the last examination, VA was stable or improved in 106 eyes (70.7%); 11 eyes (7.3%) lost ≥3 lines. Mean logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution VA measured 0.22 ± 0.1 (0–0.3) at presentation and 0.22 ± 0.2 (0–1.3) at the last visit. Corresponding values for central macular thickness were 267 ± 75 μm (137–562) and 226 ± 75 μm (75–568) (P = 0.14). The most frequent complication (18 eyes, 12%) was corneal epithelial defects.

Conclusion: Prompt intravitreal bevacizumab treatment for newly diagnosed exudative age-related macular degeneration in patients with good initial best-corrected visual acuity is associated with sustained or improved vision and a good safety profile. Attempts should be made to expedite the access of these patients to treatment, regardless of initial VA.

In Brief

Prompt intravitreous bevacizumab treatment for newly diagnosed exudative age-related macular degeneration in patients with good initial visual acuity (≥20/40) is associated with sustained or improved vision and a good safety profile.

Author Information

*Department of Ophthalmology, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Campus, Petach Tikva, Israel

Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

Reprint requests: Ruth Axer-Siegel, MD, Department of Ophthalmology, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Campus, 39 Jabotinski Street, Petach Tikva 49100, Israel; e-mail: seegs@netvision.co.il

The authors have no financial/conflicts of interest to disclose.

R. Axer-Siegel and E. Bor contributed equally to this article as first authors.

© The Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.