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USE OF FUNDUS AUTOFLUORESCENCE IMAGES TO PREDICT GEOGRAPHIC ATROPHY PROGRESSION

Bearelly, Srilaxmi MD, MHS*†; Khanifar, Aziz A MD*; Lederer, David E MD*; Lee, Jane J BS; Ghodasra, Jason H BA; Stinnett, Sandra S DrPH*; Cousins, Scott W MD*

doi: 10.1097/IAE.0b013e3181e0958b
Original Study

Purpose: Fundus autofluorescence imaging has been shown to be helpful in predicting progression of geographic atrophy (GA) secondary to age-related macular degeneration. We assess the ability of fundus autofluorescence imaging to predict rate of GA progression using a simple categorical scheme.

Methods: Subjects with GA secondary to age-related macular degeneration with fundus autofluorescence imaging acquired at least 12 months apart were included. Rim area focal hyperautofluorescence was defined as percentage of the 500-μm-wide margin bordering the GA that contained increased autofluorescence. Rim area focal hyperautofluorescence on baseline fundus autofluorescence images was assessed and categorized depending on the extent of rim area focal hyperautofluorescence (Category 1: ≤33%; Category 2: between 33 and 67%; Category 3: ≥67%). Total GA areas at baseline and follow-up were measured to calculate change in GA progression.

Results: Forty-five eyes of 45 subjects were included; average duration of follow-up was 18.5 months. Median growth rates differed among categories of baseline rim area focal hyperautofluorescence (P = 0.01 among Categories 1, 2, and 3; P = 0.008 for Category 1 compared with Category 3, Jonckheere-Terpstra test).

Conclusion: A simple categorical scheme that stratifies the amount of increased autofluorescence in the 500-μm margin bordering GA may be used to differentiate faster and slower progressors.

A simple categorical scheme that stratifies the amount of increased autofluorescence in the 500-μm margin bordering GA may be used to differentiate faster and slower progressors.

From the *Duke Center for Macular Diseases and Albert Eye Research Institute, Duke University Eye Center, Durham, North Carolina; †Edward S. Harkness Eye Institute, Columbia University, New York, New York; and ‡Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.

Supported by NEI 1K23 EY018895-01 and NIH P30-EY005722 Core Grant for Vision Research.

Presented in part at the Retinal Degenerations Meeting, International Congress of Eye Research; Chengdu, China; September 2008.

The authors have no proprietary interest in any aspect of this report.

Reprint requests: Srilaxmi Bearelly, MD, MHS, Edward S. Harkness Eye Institute, Columbia University, 635 W. 165th Street, Box EI-8, New York, New York 10032; e-mail: sb3179@columbia.edu

© The Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.