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Bipolar disorder ANK3 risk variant effect on sustained attention is replicated in a large healthy population

Hatzimanolis, Alexa,b; Smyrnis, Nikolaosa,b; Avramopoulos, Dimitriosc; Stefanis, Costas N.a; Evdokimidis, Ioannisa; Stefanis, Nicholas C.a,b,d

Psychiatric Genetics:
doi: 10.1097/YPG.0b013e328353ae79
Brief Reports
Abstract

Independent genome-wide association studies have implicated a common single nucleotide polymorphism within the ANK3 gene (rs10994336) in bipolar disorder (BD) susceptibility, thus establishing rs10994336 marker as a strong candidate predisposing genetic factor for BD. Furthermore, recent findings demonstrate that this variant impacts on cognitive functioning in BD patients, their unaffected relatives, and healthy controls by influencing sustained attention. Here, we aimed to replicate this finding in a large population-based sample of healthy young adults (n=1808). Sustained attention was evaluated using the Continuous Performance Test as in the original study and working memory was assessed with the n-back task. Individuals carrying the BD risk T-allele showed significantly reduced sensitivity in target detection, increased errors of commission, and atypical response latency variability. In addition, we confirmed the lack of an association between the rs10994336 variant and working memory, as well as general intellectual ability, suggesting a specific effect on the Continuous Performance Test performance.

Author Information

aUniversity Mental Health Research Institute

bDepartment of Psychiatry, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece

cMcKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

dCentre for Clinical Research in Neuropsychiatry, School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia

Correspondence to Nicholas C. Stefanis, MD, Centre for Clinical Research in Neuropsychiatry, School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, The University of Western Australia, Gascoyne House, John XXIII Avenue, Mt Claremont, Perth, WA 6010, Australia Tel: +61 893 476 439; fax: +61 893 845 128; e-mail: nikos.stefanis@uwa.edu.au

Received June 28, 2011

Accepted January 12, 2012

© 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.