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Nonreplication of an association of SGIP1 SNPs with alcohol dependence and resting theta EEG power

Derringer, Jaimea; Krueger, Robert F.a; Manz, Niklasb; Porjesz, Berniceb; Almasy, Laurac; Bookman, Ebonyd; Edenberg, Howard J.e; Kramer, John R.f; Tischfield, Jay A.g; Bierut, Laura J.h

Psychiatric Genetics:
doi: 10.1097/YPG.0b013e32834371fd
Brief Reports
Abstract

A recent study in a sample of Plains Indians showed association between eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the SGIP1 gene and resting θ electroencephalogram (EEG) power. This association appeared to generalize to alcohol use disorders, for which EEG power is a potential endophenotype. We analyzed a large, diverse sample for replication of the association of these implicated SGIP1 SNPs (genotyped on the Illumina 1M platform) with alcohol dependence (N=3988) and θ EEG power (N=1066). We found no evidence of association of the earlier implicated SGIP1 SNPs with either alcohol dependence or θ EEG power (all P>0.15) in this sample. The earlier implicated SNPs located in SGIP1 gene showed no association with alcohol dependence or θ EEG power in this sample of individuals with European and/or African ancestry. This failure to replicate may be the result of differences in ancestry between this sample and the original sample.

Author Information

aDepartment of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota

bSUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York

cSouthwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, Texas

dNational Human Genome Research Institute, Bethesda, Maryland

eIndiana University, Indiana

fUniversity of Iowa, Iowa

gRutgers University, New Jersey

hWashington University in Saint Louis, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA

Correspondence to Jaime Derringer, MA, Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, N218 Elliott Hall, 75 E River Rd, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA Tel: +1 612 412 1107; fax: +1 612 825 6280; e-mail: derri023@umn.edu

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Received August 2, 2010

Accepted November 23, 2010

© 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.