You could be reading the full-text of this article now if you...

If you have access to this article through your institution,
you can view this article in

Association study between alcoholism and endocannabinoid metabolic enzyme genes encoding fatty acid amide hydrolase and monoglyceride lipase in a Japanese population

Iwasaki, Shinyaa; Ishiguro, Hirokia; Higuchi, Susumub; Onaivi, Emmanuel S.c; Arinami, Tadaoa

Psychiatric Genetics:
doi: 10.1097/YPG.0b013e32809913d8
Original Articles
Abstract

Background: Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoglyceride lipase (MGLL) are the major endocannabinoid metabolic enzymes. Owing to the importance of endocannabinoid system in addiction, the Pro129Thr polymorphism in the FAAH gene has reportedly been associated with substance abuse and dependence in a Caucasian population.

Objective: To determine whether the single nucleodtide polymorphisms of the FAAH and MGLL genes are associated with alcoholism in a Japanese population.

Methods: We conducted case–control studies for total 14 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms in those two genes using Japanese 729 patients with alcoholism and 799 healthy controls. Genotype and allele frequencies were compared between these groups.

Results: None of these genetic markers, however, showed significant association with alcoholism in Japanese.

Conclusion: Whereas we examined associations in a larger sample size between alcoholism and tag single nucleotide polymorphisms that covered most regions of these endocannabinoid metabolic enzyme genes, we found that these are not associated with susceptibility to alcoholism in a Japanese population.

Author Information

aDepartment of Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki

bNational Alcoholism Center, Kurihama National Hospital, Yokosuka, Kanagawa, Japan

cDepartment of Biology, William Paterson University, Wayne, NJ, USA

Correspondence to Dr Hiroki Ishiguro, MD, PhD, Department of Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennohdai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577, Japan

Tel: +81 29 853 3352; fax: +81 29 853 3333;

e-mail: hishigur@md.tsukuba.ac.jp

Received 9 January 2006 Accepted 8 January 2007

© 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.