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Microtia Reconstruction and Postsurgical Grisel’s Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Torticollis in a Child

Wang, Jay Ching Chieh MD*; Malic, Claudia MD, FRCS (Plast); Reilly, Christopher MD, FRCSC‡§; Verchere, Cynthia MD, FRCSC†¶

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery – Global Open: June 2014 - Volume 2 - Issue 6 - p e176
doi: 10.1097/GOX.0000000000000117
Case Reports
Canada

Summary: Grisel’s syndrome is an unusual but important cause of torticollis which may be encountered in a pediatric plastic surgery practice, where craniofacial and oropharyngeal surgeries are commonly performed. Grisel’s syndrome is characterized by painful torticollis and limited cervical rotation, and the diagnosis is confirmed via radiologic imaging. Initial management of Grisel’s syndrome is with anti-inflammatories and in some cases antibiotics. In unresolving or recurrent cases, more invasive treatments, such as cervical collar, halo, or surgical arthrodesis, may be considered.

From the *School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; Division of Paediatric Plastic Surgery, BC Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada; Division of Paediatric Orthopaedics, Department of Orthopedics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; §Division of Paediatric Orthopaedics, BC Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada; and Division of Paediatric Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Received for publication February 25, 2014; accepted April 11, 2014.

Disclosure: The authors have no financial interest to declare in relation to the content of this article. The Article Processing Charge was paid for by the authors.

Cynthia Verchere, MD, FRCSC, Division of Plastic Surgery, BC Children’s Hospital, University of British Columbia, Room K3-131, P.O. Box 150, 4480 Oak Street, Vancouver, BC V6H 3V4, Canada, E-mail: cverchere@cw.bc.ca

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© 2014 American Society of Plastic Surgeons