Home Current Issue Previous Issues Published Ahead-of-Print Collections For Authors Journal Info
Skip Navigation LinksHome > January 2013 - Volume 19 - Issue 1 > Assessing Suitability for Short-Term Cognitive-Behavioral Th...
Journal of Psychiatric Practice:
doi: 10.1097/01.pra.0000426325.49396.4c
Articles

Assessing Suitability for Short-Term Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in Psychiatric Outpatients with Psychosis: A Comparison with Depressed and Anxious Outpatients

MYHR, GAIL MD, CM; RUSSELL, JENNIFER J. PhD; SAINT-LAURENT, MARIE MD; TAGALAKIS, VICKI MEd; BELISLE, DOMINIQUE MD; KHODARY, FATIMA MScA; FARIDI, KIA MD; PINARD, GILBERT MD

Collapse Box

Abstract

Objective. The Suitability for Short-Term Cognitive Therapy (SSCT) rating procedure has predicted outcome in depressed and anxious patients. This study examines its relevance in assessing patients with psychosis. Method. Outpatients with psychosis (n=56), depression (n=93), and anxiety (n=264) received cognitive- behavioral therapy in a university hospital teaching unit (mean number of sessions=16, SD=11). Demographic, clinical, and suitability variables were assessed as potential predictors of dropout and success as measured by the Reliable Change Index. Results. Despite lower suitability scores in the psychosis group, dropout and success rates were similar across groups, although the magnitude of symptom reduction was less in the psychosis group. Across diagnoses, dropout was predicted by unemployment and by reluctance to take personal responsibility for change. In the psychosis group only, dropout was predicted by hostility. Success of completed therapy was predicted by higher baseline agoraphobic anxiety and “responsibility for change” scores. Conclusion. Attention to hostility early in therapy may reduce dropout in psychotic patients. Fostering acceptance of responsibility for change may improve both treatment retention and success across diagnoses. Agoraphobic fear is associated with success, possibly reflecting the effectiveness of behavioral interventions in psychosis and anxiety alike.

© 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

Login

Search for Similar Articles
You may search for similar articles that contain these same keywords or you may modify the keyword list to augment your search.