PRSonally Speaking

Monday, February 24, 2014

Articles of Interest: The Graft to Capacity Ratio - Volumetric Planning in Large Volume Fat Transplantation
At least twice a month, PRSonally Speaking posts full abstracts of interesting or potentially controversial articles from a future issue. This 'sneak preview' of a hot article is meant to give you some food for thought and provide you with topic for conversation among colleagues.
 
When the article is published in print with the March issue, it will be FREE for a period of Two Months, to help the conversation continue in the PRS community and beyond. So read the abstract, join the conversation and spread the word.
 
This week we present the introduction to "The Graft to Capacity Ratio - Volumetric Planning in Large Volume Fat Transplantation" by Del Vecchio et al.
 
Background: Variability in large volume fat transplantation has been linked to technique. Meanwhile, the recipient site volume and its relation to the volume of grafted fat has been relatively overlooked. Graft to capacity concepts are evidenced in
other soft tissue transplantation procedures such as skin and hair transplantation. We define the Graft to Capacity Ratio as the volume of grafted fat in relation to the volume of the recipient site. We postulate its theoretical limits, and empirically analyze its
potential clinical importance in large volume fat transplantation.
Methods: Thirty cases of large volume fat transplantation to the breast were reviewed. All patients underwent pre-operative quantitative volumetric analysis using threedimensional breast imaging and underwent large volume fat transplantation using the large syringe technique. The volume of fat transplanted into each breast at the time of surgery was noted. Quantitative volumetric breast imaging was repeated 12 months postoperatively.
Results: The average Graph to Capacity Ratio was 117% with a standard deviation of 22%, consistent with deduced theoretical limits. Cases where the Graft to Capacity Ratio exceeded one standard deviation demonstrated lower percent volume maintenance. Cases where the Graft to Capacity Ratio was lower than one standard deviation appeared to demonstrate higher percent volume maintenance. Univariate linear regression of percent volume maintenance as a function of Graft to Capacity
demonstrated a significant inverse relationship.

Conclusion: The Graft to Capacity Ratio appears to be a relevant variable in percent volume maintenance outcomes and may be useful in establishing consistency in large volume fat transplantation.
 
The full article will be published with the March 2014 issue of PRS, and will be free online for non-subscribers. Until then, we hope this "sneak peek" will pique your interests and start a healthy, meaningful conversation.for non-subscribers. Until then, we hope this "sneak peek" will pique your interests and start a healthy, meaningful conversation.