Skip Navigation LinksHome > March 2013 - Volume 131 - Issue 3 > Reply: Harvesting the Lateral Femoral Circumflex Chimera Fr...
Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery:
doi: 10.1097/PRS.0b013e31827c72ca
Letters

Reply: Harvesting the Lateral Femoral Circumflex Chimera Free Flap: Guidelines for Elevation

Adler, Neta M.D.; Dorafshar, Amir H. M.D.; Agarwal, Jayant P. M.D.; Gottlieb, Lawrence J. M.D.

Free Access
Article Outline
Collapse Box

Author Information

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Department, Hadassa University Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel (Adler)

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Department, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md. (Dorafshar)

Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (Agarwal)

Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill. (Gottlieb)

Correspondence to Dr. Gottlieb, Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Chicago Medicine and Biological Sciences, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, Room J-641, MC6035, Chicago, Ill. 60637 lgottlie@surgery.bsd.uchicago.edu

Back to Top | Article Outline

Sir:

We appreciate Dr. Li and colleagues' attempt to study our 12-step approach for harvesting the lateral femoral circumflex perforator chimera flap in a cadaver. Unfortunately, they evaluated only the first five steps. They mention that they had trouble finding the perforators by performing the proximal medial incision and dissecting from the pedicle to the perforators. However, in our article, we describe this first incision primarily for orientation and finding the location of the lateral femoral circumflex pedicle. Extension of this incision allows for further exploration with little risk of inadvertently injuring any perforators. An additional benefit of this approach is that this exploration can be performed simultaneously with the extirpation of tumor or recipient-site preparation before knowing the size, type, and number of each tissue component of the chimera flap needed to fulfill the reconstructive requirements. We then describe, in step 6 of our article, a free-style retrograde and antegrade approach to dissecting cutaneous perforators. Therefore, although our skin marking and initial incision are different from theirs, the actual dissection of the perforators is similar.

Figure. No caption a...
Figure. No caption a...
Image Tools

Neta Adler, M.D.

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Department, Hadassa University Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel

Amir H. Dorafshar, M.D.

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Department, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md.

Jayant P. Agarwal, M.D.

Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

Lawrence J. Gottlieb, M.D.

Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.

Back to Top | Article Outline
DISCLOSURE

The authors have no financial interest to declare in relation to the content of this communication.

Back to Top | Article Outline

GUIDELINES

Letters to the Editor, discussing material recently published in the Journal, are welcome. They will have the best chance of acceptance if they are received within 8 weeks of an article's publication. Letters to the Editor may be published with a response from the authors of the article being discussed. Discussions beyond the initial letter and response will not be published. Letters submitted pertaining to published Discussions of articles will not be printed. Letters to the Editor are not usually peer reviewed, but the Journal may invite replies from the authors of the original publication. All Letters are published at the discretion of the Editor.

Letters submitted should pose a specific question that clarifies a point that either was not made in the article or was unclear, and therefore a response from the corresponding author of the article is requested.

Authors will be listed in the order in which they appear in the submission. Letters should be submitted electronically via PRS' enkwell, at www.editorialmanager.com/prs/.

We reserve the right to edit Letters to meet requirements of space and format. Any financial interests relevant to the content of the correspondence must be disclosed. Submission of a Letter constitutes permission for the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and its licensees and asignees to publish it in the Journal and in any other form or medium.

The views, opinions, and conclusions expressed in the Letters to the Editor represent the personal opinions of the individual writers and not those of the publisher, the Editorial Board, or the sponsors of the Journal. Any stated views, opinions, and conclusions do not reflect the policy of any of the sponsoring organizations or of the institutions with which the writer is affiliated, and the publisher, the Editorial Board, and the sponsoring organizations assume no responsibility for the content of such correspondence.

The Journal requests that individuals submit no more than five (5) letters to Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery in a calendar year.

©2013American Society of Plastic Surgeons

Login

Article Tools

Images

Share


The Clinical Masters of PRS – Breast eBooks
4 Essential eBooks for Plastic Surgeons