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Is the High Superior Tension Technique an Equivalent Substitute for Progressive Tension Sutures in Postbariatric Abdominoplasty? A Comparison Prospective Study

Margara, Andrea M.D.; Boriani, Filippo M.D.; Granchi, Donatella M.D.; Baldini, Nicola M.D., Ph.D.

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery: March 2014 - Volume 133 - Issue 3 - p 544–549
doi: 10.1097/PRS.0000000000000074
Cosmetic: Original Articles

Background: The addition of progressive tension sutures to the abdominoplasty technique is advocated to reduce the risk of several complications. High superior tension abdominoplasty is another technique aimed at reducing tension at the prepubic suture line and improving cosmesis of the umbilical area.

Methods: A cohort of massive weight loss patients undergoing abdominoplasty, treated with the progressive tension suture technique in association with the high superior tension technique (group A), was followed up and compared to a cohort of patients who underwent high superior tension abdominoplasty (group B). Several variables including rate of complications and patient satisfaction were explored to determine any possible benefit deriving from the combination of progressive tension suture and high superior tension techniques in the abdominoplasty.

Results: A total of 90 patients were included in the study, of whom 34 were in group A and 56 were in group B. No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups in terms of duration of the procedure, hospitalization time, rate of complications, drained volume, and patient or physician satisfaction.

Conclusion: No beneficial effect appears to derive from the progressive tension suture technique in massive weight loss patients undergoing abdominoplasty, provided that the high superior tension technique is performed as an adjunct to the traditional method.

Turin and Bologna, Italy

From the Department of Plastic Surgery, All Medical Group; and the Laboratory of Orthopaedic Pathophysiology and Regenerative Medicine, Rizzoli Institute and University of Bologna.

Received for publication June 25, 2013; accepted September 11, 2013.

Disclosure: None of the authors has a financial interest in any of the products or devices mentioned in this article. No funding has been received for this article by any author.

Filippo Boriani, M.D., Laboratory of Orthopaedic Pathophysiology and Regenerative Medicine, Rizzoli Institute and University of Bologna, Via Barbiano 1/10, Bologna, Italy, borianifilippo@gmail.com

©2014American Society of Plastic Surgeons