Skip Navigation LinksHome > November 2011 - Volume 128 - Issue 5 > High-Throughput Assay for Bacterial Adhesion on Acellular De...
Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery:
doi: 10.1097/PRS.0b013e31822b65af
Experimental: Original Articles

High-Throughput Assay for Bacterial Adhesion on Acellular Dermal Matrices and Synthetic Surgical Materials

Nyame, Theodore T. M.D.; Lemon, Katherine P. M.D., Ph.D.; Kolter, Roberto Ph.D.; Liao, Eric C. M.D., Ph.D.

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Abstract

Background: There has been increasing use of synthetic and acellular dermal matrix materials in surgery, ranging from breast reconstruction to hernia repairs. There is a paucity of data on how acellular dermal matrix compares with other surgical materials as a substrate for bacterial adhesion, the first step in formation biofilm, which occurs in prosthetic wound infections. The authors have designed a high-throughput assay to evaluate Staphylococcus aureus adherence on various synthetic and biologically derived materials.

Methods: Clinical isolates of S. aureus (strains SC-1 and UAMS-1) were cultured with different materials, and bacterial adherence was measured using a resazurin cell vitality assay. Four materials that are commonly used in surgery were evaluated: Prolene mesh, Vicryl mesh, and two different acellular dermal matrix preparations (AlloDerm and FlexHD). The authors were able to develop a high-throughput and reliable assay for quantifying bacterial adhesion on synthetic and biologically derived materials.

Results: The resazurin vitality assay can be reliably used to quantify bacterial adherence to acellular dermal matrix material and synthetic material. S. aureus strains SC-1 and UAMS-1 both adhered better to acellular dermal matrix materials (AlloDerm versus FlexHD) than to the synthetic material Prolene. S. aureus also adhered better to Vicryl than to Prolene. Strain UAMS-1 adhered better to Vicryl and acellular dermal matrix materials than did strain SC-1.

Conclusions: The results show that S. aureus adheres more readily to acellular dermal matrix material than to synthetic material. The resazurin assay provides a standard method for evaluating surgical materials with regard to bacterial adherence and potential propensity for biofilm development.

©2011American Society of Plastic Surgeons

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