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Anthropometric Measurements of the Endoscopic Eyebrow Lift in the Treatment of Facial Paralysis

Takushima, Akihiko M.D.; Harii, Kiyonori M.D.; Sugawara, Yasushi M.D.; Asato, Hirotaka M.D.

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery: June 2003 - Volume 111 - Issue 7 - p 2157-2165
doi: 10.1097/01.PRS.0000060108.95154.EA
Original Articles

Endoscopic eyebrow lift was performed on 51 patients presenting with eyebrow ptosis due to facial paralysis. The resulting anthropometric measurements of eyebrow position were analyzed statistically to evaluate the effectiveness of this method. When preoperative eyebrow differences between the paralyzed and nonparalyzed sides were measured, the average difference at midpoint was 4.4 mm, and at the highest point, 4.6 mm. When the same points were measured postoperatively, the average difference at midpoint was 2.4 mm, and at the highest point, 2.3 mm. The difference in eyebrow height between the paralyzed and nonparalyzed sides correlated positively with age, both preoperatively and postoperatively. However, differences between preoperative and postoperative eyebrow height (which reflects the effectiveness of endoscopic eyebrow lift) at the highest point did not correlate with age and at the midpoint displayed a slightly negative correlation with age. These results suggest that endoscopic eyebrow lift is effective among young patients whose eyebrow ptosis is minor and is relatively ineffective among elderly patients whose eyebrow ptosis is severe. The conventional method of juxta-brow excision is indicated for elderly patients, for whom the operative scar is almost inconspicuous.

Tokyo and Tochigi, Japan

From the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo; and the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Jichi Medical School.

Received for publication May 17, 2002;

revised August 8, 2002.

Presented at the 45th Annual Meeting of the Japan Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, in Nagasaki, Japan, April 17 through 19, 2002.

Akihiko Takushima, M.D.

Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Graduate School of Medicine

University of Tokyo

7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku

Tokyo 113-8655, Japan

takushima-pla@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp

©2003American Society of Plastic Surgeons