Skip Navigation LinksHome > October 2007 - Volume 26 - Issue 10 > CME Overview: The Global Burden of Acute Otitis Media in Chi...
Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal:
doi: 10.1097/INF.0b013e318154b228
CME Overview

CME Overview: The Global Burden of Acute Otitis Media in Children: Outcomes, Management and Prospects for Prevention

Free Access
Continued Medical Education
Back to Top | Article Outline

Accreditation and Certification

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and Policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of Boston University School of Medicine and The Physicians Academy for Clinical and Management Excellence. Boston University School of Medicine is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Boston University School of Medicine designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Statements of credit will be provided by mail within six weeks following activity participation and upon completion and return of evaluation form to Boston University School of Medicine at BUSM CME, E.PCV11PA07, 715 Albany St., A-305, Boston, MA 02118, Fax: 617-638-4905. For CME questions, please call BUSM CME at 617-638-4605.

Back to Top | Article Outline

Intended Audience

This activity has been designed for adult and pediatric clinical infectious disease specialists, microbiologists, and vaccinologists. It will provide material that is relevant to the concerns of clinicians and researchers who are interested in the treatment and management of infectious disease and how these strategies impact on patient outcomes.

Back to Top | Article Outline

Educational Needs Addressed

Acute otitis media (AOM) is one of the most common afflictions affecting children under the age of 5 years of age. In developed countries, nearly every child becomes a nasopharyngeal carrier of S. pneumoniae (SP) during the first year of life and the pathogen persists in the nasopharynx, which is significant as most cases of AOM result from a middle ear reflux from the nasopharynx. In developing countries, SP is one of the most notable bacterial pathogens for children under 6 months of age. Based upon available data, SP is estimated to kill one million children under five years of age worldwide. New vaccines are needed to provide the protective immunity necessary against the large number of SP serotypes that exist globally. The changing microbiology of SP disease, with a shift from SP to non-typeable H. influenzae (NTHi), likely based on the impact of currently available vaccine, demonstrates the even greater need for education on the use of existing and emergent conjugate vaccines in treating AOM. Success will also require expanded coverage against additional otopathogens, especially NTHi. A meaningful educational and action-oriented approach will enhance the global ability to prevent and treat AOM and its sequelae.

1. World Health Organization. World Development Report 1993: Investing in Health. Oxford: Oxford University Press; 1993:215-222.

2. Poehling KA, Lafleur BJ, Szilagyi PG, et al. Population-based impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in young children. Pediatrics. 2004;114:755-761.

3. Acuin J. Chronic suppurative otitis media: burden of illness and management options. World Health Organization (WHO). 2006 update.

4. Belshe RB, Edwards KM, Vesikari T, et al. Live attenuated versus inactivated influenza vaccine in infants and young children. N Engl J Med. 2007;356:685-696.

Back to Top | Article Outline

Educational Objectives

Upon completion of this educational activity participant should be better able to:

1. Describe the global demographics and burden of Acute Otitis Media citing current available data.

2. Discuss the management of children with recurrent and relapsing respiratory tract disease, specifically Acute Otitis Media.

3. Outline the impact of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine on Acute Otitis Media in the US and discuss the global implication of a vaccine targeting both pneumococcal and H. influenzae (NTHi) respiratory infections.

Release date   October 1, 2007   Expiration date   September 30, 2008

Back to Top | Article Outline

Estimated Time to Complete This Activity

1 hour and 15 minutes

Back to Top | Article Outline

Method of Participation

In order to successfully complete this activity, participants are required to read the entire supplement and complete and submit the test answer sheet by September 30, 2008. CME credit will be awarded provided a score of 70% or better is achieved. Statements of credit will be provided by mail within six weeks of receipt of the test answers to those who successfully complete the examination.

Back to Top | Article Outline

Course Director

Stephen I. Pelton, MD

Chief, Pediatric Infectious Disease

Boston Medical School

Professor of Pediatrics and Epidemiology

Boston University School of Medicine

Back to Top | Article Outline

Faculty

Lauren O. Bakaletz, PhD

Professor of Pediatrics

The Ohio State University, College of Medicine

Director, Center for Microbial Pathogenesis

Columbus Children's Research Institute

Janet R. Casey, MD

Legacy Pediatrics, PLLC

University of Rochester, School of Medicine and Dentistry

Amanda J. Leach, PhD

Ear and Respiratory Health Unit

Tropical and Infectious Diseases Division

Menzies School of Health Research

Charles Darwin University

Eugene Leibovitz, MD

Pediatric Infectious Disease Unit

Soroka Medical Center and The Faculty of Health Sciences

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Peter S. Morris, MBBS, FRACP, PhD

Deputy Leader of Child Health Division

Menzies School of Health Research

Charles Darwin University

Associate Professor of Pediatrics

Flinders University

Michael E. Pichichero, MD

Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Medicine

University of Rochester, School of Medicine and Dentistry

Back to Top | Article Outline

Disclosure Policy

Boston University School of Medicine asks all individuals involved in the development and presentation of Continuing Medical Education (CME) activities to disclose all relationships with commercial interests. This information is disclosed to CME activity participants. Boston University School of Medicine has procedures to resolve apparent conflicts of interest. In addition, faculty members are asked to disclose when any discussion of unapproved use of pharmaceuticals and devices is being discussed.

Back to Top | Article Outline

Disclosures

Stephen I. Pelton, MD has indicated that he has received grant/research support from Sanofi-Aventis; serves as a consultant for GlaxoSmithKline and Wyeth; and has been on the Speakers Bureau for Sanofi-Aventis. Dr. Pelton does not plan to discuss off-label/investigational uses of commercial products.

Amanda J. Leach, PhD has no relevant financial relationships to disclose. Dr. Leach does not plan to discuss off-labeled/investigational uses of commercial products.

Peter S. Morris, PhD has no relevant financial relationships to disclose. Dr. Morris does not plan to discuss off-label/investigational uses of commercial products.

Eugene Leibovitz, MD has no relevant financial relationships to disclose. Dr. Leibovitz does not plan to discuss off-label/investigational uses of commercial products.

Michael E. Pichichero, MD has indicated that he has received grant/research support from Abbott, GlaxoSmithKline, MedImmune, Sanofi-Aventis, and Sanofi-Pasteur; Honoraria from Abbott, GlaxoSmithKline, Sanofi-Aventis, and Sanofi-Pastuer. Dr. Pichichero does not plan to discuss off-label/investigational uses of commercial products.

Janet R. Casey, MD has indicated that she has been a single-day consultant for Abbott, GlaxoSmithKline, Sanofi-Aventis, and Sanofi-Pasteur. Dr. Casey does not plan to discuss off-label/investigational uses of commercial products.

Lauren Bakaletz, PhD has indicated that she has received grant/research support from GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals. Dr. Bakaletz does not plan to discuss off-label/investigational uses of commercial products.

Planning Committee: Mary Deering, Barry A. Fiedel, PhD, Heidi J. Katz, RPh, Amy Klopfenstien, MS and Kelly McPherson of Physicians Academy, along with Julie White, MS, Elizabeth Gifford and Elizabeth D. Barnett, MD of Boston University School of Medicine have no relevant financial relationships to disclose.

These materials and all other materials provided in conjunction with continuing medical education activities are intended solely for purposes of supplementing continuing medical education programs for qualified health care professionals. Anyone using the materials assumes full responsibility and all risk for their appropriate use. Trustees of Boston University makes no warranties or representations whatsoever regarding the accuracy, completeness, currentness, noninfringements, merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose of the materials. In no event will Trustees of Boston University be liable to anyone for any decision made or action taken in reliance on the materials. In no event should the information in the materials be used as a substitute for professional care.

For questions regarding CME, please contact cme@bu.edu

Boston University Privacy Policy: http://www.bu.edu/cme/policies/privacy_policy.html

© 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

Login