You could be reading the full-text of this article now if you...

If you have access to this article through your institution,
you can view this article in

Insights into Pediatric Herpes Simplex Encephalitis From a Cohort of 21 Children From the California Encephalitis Project, 19982011

To, Tu M. MPH*†‡; Soldatos, Ariane MD§; Sheriff, Heather; Schmid, D. Scott PhD; Espinosa, Natasha; Cosentino, Giorgio; Preas, Christopher P.; Glaser, Carol A. DVM, MPVM, MD

Erratum

In the article on page 1287, volume 33, issue 12, there are number and percentage errors in the text and Table 1. In the abstract the second sentence should appear as “Noteworthy features included 6 (29%) patients with an initial negative herpes simplex virus cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction test and 13 (62%) patients with extratemporal lobe involvement identified by neuroimaging.” In the first paragraph of the Results section, the third sentence should appear as “Nine (43%) patients were Hispanic, 5 (24%) White and 4 (19%) Asian/Pacific Islander.” The third paragraph of Results section, should appear as below:

Neuroimaging [computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] was abnormal in many patients: 20 (95%) for MRI and 13 (68%) for CT scans (Table 1). The MRI findings showed 7 patients had isolated temporal lobe involvement, 9 had temporal and extratemporal lobe involvement and 4 had exclusively extratemporal lobe involvement. Overall, neuroimaging identified 13 (62%) patients with extratemporal lobe involvement (including those with simultaneous temporal and extratemporal abnormalities). A hemorrhagic component was seen in 5 (23%) patients. For the 15 patients with EEG testing, 13 (87%) were abnormal. Eight (53%) of these 15 patients had diffuse or multifocal slowing in their EEG, 2 (13%) had periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges and 3 (20%) had temporal epileptiform activity.

In the fourth paragraph of the Results section, the first sentence should appear as “Of the 21 patients, 4 (19%) died during their hospitalization despite receiving acyclovir treatment at time of admission.” The corrected table appears below.

The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal. 34(9):960, September 2015.

Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal:
doi: 10.1097/INF.0000000000000422
Brief Reports
Abstract

Twenty-one children with confirmed herpes simplex encephalitis were identified in the California Encephalitis Project. Noteworthy features included 6 (29%) patients with an initial negative herpes simplex virus cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction test and 13 (59%) patients with extratemporal lobe involvement identified by neuroimaging. Eleven cases were <4 years of age, but all 4 fatal cases occurred in adolescents.

Author Information

From the *Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco; Communicable Disease and Emergency Response Branch, Division of Communicable Disease Control, Center for Infectious Diseases, California Department of Public Health, Richmond; California Epidemiologic Investigation Service (Cal-EIS), California Department of Public Health, Sacramento, CA; §National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD; Viral and Rickettsial Disease Laboratory, Division of Communicable Disease Control, Center for Infectious Diseases, California Department of Public Health, Richmond, CA; and Measles, Mumps, Rubella, and Herpesvirus Laboratory Branch, Division of Viral Diseases, Office of Infectious Diseases, National Center for Immunizations and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.

Financial support was by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Emerging Infections Program (U50/CCU915546-09).

The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Department of Health and Human Services.

The authors have no other funding or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal’s website (www.pidj.com).

Address for correspondence: Tu My To, MPH, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Lobby 5, Suite 5700, San Francisco, CA 94107. E-mail tumy.to@ucsf.edu.

© 2014 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.