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Frequency and Trajectory of Abnormalities in Respiratory Rate, Temperature and Oxygen Saturation in Severe Pneumonia In Children

Izadnegahdar, Rasa MD*; Fox, Matthew P. MPH, DSc*‡; Thea, Donald M. MSc, MD*‡; Qazi, Shamim A. MSc, MD§; for the Pneumonia Studies Group

Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal: August 2012 - Volume 31 - Issue 8 - p 863–865
doi: 10.1097/INF.0b013e318257f8ec
Brief Reports

The frequency or trajectory of vital sign abnormalities in children with pneumonia has not been described. In a cohort of 2714 patients with severe pneumonia identified and treated as per the World Health Organization definition and recommendations, tachypnea, fever and hypoxia were found in 68.9%, 23.6% and 15.5% of children, respectively. Median oxygen saturation returned to a normal range by 10 hours following initiation of treatment, followed by temperature at 12 hours and respiratory rate at 22 hours for subjects <12 months and at 48 hours for those ≥12 months of age.

From the *Center for Global Health and Development, Boston University, Boston, MA; Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Department of International Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA; and §Department of Maternal Newborn Child and Adolescent Health, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.

Accepted for publication March 29, 2012

S.A.Q. is a medical officer in the Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development, WHO. M.P.F. was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) under Award Number K01AI083097. The NIAID and USAID had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish or preparation of the manuscript. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of WHO, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the National Institutes of Health or other parties. The authors have no other funding or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Address for Correspondence: Rasa Izadnegahdar, MD, Center for Global Health and Development, Boston University, Crosstown Center, 3rd Floor 801 Massachusetts Avenue Boston, MA 02118. E-mail: rasa@bu.edu.

© 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.