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Viral Coinfection in Children Less Than Five Years Old With Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

Launes, Cristian MD*; de-Sevilla, Mariona-Fernandez MD*; Selva, Laura MSc; Garcia-Garcia, Juan-Jose MD, PhD*; Pallares, Roman MD, PhD; Muñoz-Almagro, Carmen MD, PhD

Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal:
doi: 10.1097/INF.0b013e31824f25b0
Brief Reports
Abstract

Seventy-one patients <5 years of age who were hospitalized with invasive pneumococcal disease were studied in the period between August 2008 and December 2009. The purpose was to determine the proportion of episodes that were coinfected with respiratory virus. Viral coinfection was common (44/71; 62%), with rhinovirus and influenza virus being the most frequently detected. Highly invasive serotypes (1, 5, 7F, 14, 19A) were found in 31 of 71 patients, of whom 15 had viral coinfection (15/31; 48%). Viral detection occurred significantly more often in those episodes caused by nonhighly invasive serotypes (29/40; 72%), suggesting that a viral synergism could help those serotypes to make invasiveness more likely.

Author Information

From the *Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Hospital Sant Joan de Deu; Department of Molecular Microbiology, Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain; and the Infectious Diseases Service, Idibell, Ciberes, Hospital Bellvitge, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

Accepted for publication February 07, 2012.

This work was supported by “Caja Navarra Foundation,” “Agència de Gestió d’Ajuts Universitaris i de Recerca” [Grant number 2009/SGR00136] and “Fondo de Investigaciones Sanitarias [Proyecto PI10/02058].” The authors have no other funding or conflicts of interest to report.

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Address for correspondence: Carmen Muñoz-Almagro, MD, PhD, Molecular Microbiology Department, University Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Pº Sant Joan de Déu, nº 2, 08950 Esplugues, Barcelona, Spain. E-mail: cma@hsjdbcn.org.

© 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.