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Trends in Hospitalization for Empyema in Alaska Native Children Younger Than 10 Years of Age

Singleton, Rosalyn J. MD, MPH*†; Holman, Robert C. MS‡; Wenger, Jay MD†; Christensen, Krista Yorita PhD‡; Bulkow, Lisa R. MS†; Zulz, Tammy MPH†; Steiner, Claudia A. MD, MPH§; Cheek, James E. MD¶

Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal:
doi: 10.1097/INF.0b013e3182075e74
Brief Reports
Abstract

We analyzed hospitalizations for empyema among Alaska Native (AN) children and the general population of US children <10 years of age during the years 1998 to 2007. We also analyzed invasive pneumococcal disease in AN children. Between 1998 and 2000, the average annual hospitalization rate for empyema was higher for AN children (51.8 per 100,000/yr) than that for US children (24.2 [95% confidence interval: 20.4, 27.9] per 100,000/yr), and had increased in 2004–2007 in both populations (59.6 and 36.0 [95% confidence interval: 30.1, 41.8], respectively). Pneumococcal empyema increased in AN children despite a decrease in invasive pneumococcal disease pneumonia.

Author Information

From the *Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK; †Arctic Investigations Program, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Disease (NCEZID), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), US Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS), Anchorage, AK; ‡Division of High-Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Disease (NCEZID), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), US Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS), Atlanta, GA; §Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD; and ¶Division of Epidemiology and Prevention, Office of Public Health Support, Indian Health Service, US Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS), Albuquerque, NM.

Accepted for publication November 11, 2010.

The findings and conclusions in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the sponsoring agencies.

Address for correspondence: Rosalyn Singleton, MD, AIP-CDC, 4055 Tudor Centre Dr, Anchorage, AK 99508. E-mail: ris2@,cdc.gov.

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© 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.