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SHOULD HIGHER VANCOMYCIN TROUGH LEVELS BE TARGETED FOR INVASIVE COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN?

Jimenez-Truque, Natalia MQC, MSCI; Thomsen, Isaac MD; Saye, Elizabeth BS; Creech, C. Buddy MD, MPH

The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal: April 2010 - Volume 29 - Issue 4 - p 368-370
doi: 10.1097/INF.0b013e3181c52a04
Brief Reports

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates with vancomycin minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ≥1.5 μg/mL have been associated with poorer clinical outcomes and treatment failures in adults. We evaluated vancomycin MICs in 71 invasive pediatric community-acquired MRSA isolates from 2004 to 2008, using the E-test micromethod and the E-test macro-method. The modal MIC by micromethod was 1.5 μg/mL, and median vancomycin MICs did not increase over time.

From the Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.

Accepted for publication October 8, 2009.

Supported, in part, by Vanderbilt CTSA grant 1 UL1 RR024975 from NCRR/NIH and Fogarty International Center grant 1 R25 TW007697.

Address for correspondence: C. Buddy Creech, MD, MPH, 1161 21st Ave South, CCC-5311 Medical Center North, Nashville, TN 37232. E-mail: buddy.creech@vanderbilt.edu.

© 2010 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.