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CLINICAL PERFORMANCE OF A RAPID INFLUENZA TEST AND COMPARISON OF NASAL VERSUS THROAT SWABS TO DETECT 2009 PANDEMIC INFLUENZA A (H1N1) INFECTION IN THAI CHILDREN

Suntarattiwong, Piyarat MD*; Jarman, Richard G. PhD†; Levy, Jens PhD‡; Baggett, Henry C. MD, MPH§; Gibbons, Robert V. MD, MPH†; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee MD, DTM&H*; Simmerman, James M. PhD, RN‡

Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal:
doi: 10.1097/INF.0b013e3181c6f05c
Brief Reports
Abstract

We identified febrile pediatric outpatients seeking care for influenza like illness in Bangkok. Two nasal and 1 throat swab were tested using the QuickVue A+B rapid influenza kit and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Among 142 pandemic influenza A (H1N1)-positive patients, the QuickVue test identified 89 positive tests for a sensitivity of 62.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 54.7–70.6). Specificity was 99.2% (95% CI: 98–100). In the 0 to 2 years age group, sensitivity was 76.7% (95% CI: 61.5–91.8). Throat and nasal swabs are equally useful diagnostic specimens for reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction diagnosis.

Author Information

From the *Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health Department of Medical Service, Ministry of Public Health, Bangkok, Thailand; †US Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangkok, Thailand; ‡Influenza Division, International Emerging Infections Program, Thailand MOPH-US CDC Collaboration, Nonthaburi, Thailand; §International Emerging Infections Program, Thailand MOPH-US CDC Collaboration, Nonthaburi, Thailand.

Accepted for publication October 20, 2009.

The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official, or as reflecting the views of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Department of the Army or the Department of Defense.

Address for correspondence: James M. Simmerman, PhD, RN, International Emerging Infections Program, Thailand MOPH-US CDC Collaboration, Box 68 CDC, APO AP 96546, Nonthaburi, Thailand. E-mail: msimmerman@cdc.gov.

© 2010 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.