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CEREBROSPINAL LATEX AGGLUTINATION FAILS TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE MICROBIOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS OF PRETREATED CHILDREN WITH MENINGITIS

Nigrovic, Lise E. MD*; Kuppermann, Nathan MD, MPH§; McAdam, Alexander J. MD, PhD‡; Malley, Richard MD†

Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal: August 2004 - Volume 23 - Issue 8 - pp 786-788
Brief Reports

We conducted a 10-year retrospective study of all children who had cerebrospinal fluid latex agglutination testing for bacterial antigens performed at 1 tertiary care urban children’s hospital. Of the 176 patients with culture-negative meningitis who were pretreated with antibiotics before lumbar puncture, none had a positive latex agglutination study (0 of 176; 95% confidence interval, 0–2%). Latex agglutination studies identified no additional cases of bacterial meningitis beyond those identified by culture in pretreated patients. Clinical decision-making algorithms for the management of pretreated patients at risk for bacterial meningitis should not include latex agglutination testing.

From the Divisions of *Emergency Medicine and †Infectious Diseases, ‡Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA; and the §Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Emergency Medicine and the Department of Pediatrics, University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Davis, CA

Accepted for publication March 30, 2004.

Reprints not available.

© 2004 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.