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Prediction of Motor and Functional Outcomes in Infants Born Preterm Assessed at Term

Snider, Laurie OT, PhD; Majnemer, Annette OT, PhD; Mazer, Barbara PhD; Campbell, Suzann PT, PhD; Bos, Arend F. MD, PhD

doi: 10.1097/PEP.0b013e3181957bdc
Research Report

Purpose: To compare 3 different assessment approaches at term to infants born preterm to predict motor and functional outcomes at 12 months adjusted age.

Methods: Infants (n = 100) born at less than 32 weeks postconceptional age were assessed at term using the General Movements Assessment, Einstein Neonatal Neurobehavioral Assessment Scales, Test of Infant Motor Performance, and at 12 months adjusted age using the Alberta Infant Motor Scales, Peabody Developmental Motor Scales-2, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-Daily Living Skills, and Battelle Developmental Inventory.

Results: The General Movements Assessment (r2 = 0.04; p = 0.05) and the Test of Infant Motor Performance (r2 = 0.05; p = 0.04) predicted outcomes on the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales-2. The Test of Infant Motor Performance predicted outcomes on the Alberta Infant Motor Scales (r2 = 0.05; p = 0.04) and Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales-Daily Living Skills (odds ratio: 0.93). Delays in functional performance were found.

Conclusions: Neonatal tests at term explained a small but significant proportion of the variance in gross motor and daily living skills at 12 months adjusted age.

Neonatal tests at term of infants born preterm explained a small but significant proportion of the variance in gross motor and daily living skills at 12 months adjusted age. Clinical Bottom Line: Barbara Sargent and Linda Fetters

School of Physical and Occupational Therapy (L.S., A.M., B.M.), McGill University, Montréal, Canada; Department of Physical Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago (S.C.), Chicago, Illinois; Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Beatrix Children’s Hospital, University of Groningen (A.B.), Groningen, The Netherlands

Address correspondence to: Laurie Snider, PhD, OT, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University, 3654 Promenade Sir William Osler, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3G 1Y5. E-mail: laurie.snider@mcgill.ca

Supported by operating grants from the Canadian Institute of Health Research (MOP-49552); Hospital for Sick Children Foundation: New Investigator Grant Program; Fonds de Recherche du Québec; and Centre de Recherche Interdisciplinaire en Réadaptation.

© 2009 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.