Skip Navigation LinksHome > Winter 2012 - Volume 24 - Issue 4 > Commentary on “Reference Values for the Muscle Power Sprint...
Pediatric Physical Therapy:
doi: 10.1097/PEP.0b013e31826a1ec4
Clinical Bottom Line

Commentary on “Reference Values for the Muscle Power Sprint Test in 6- to 12-Year-Old Children”

Briggs, Matthew DPT, SCS, ATC; Heathcock, Jill C. MPT, PhD

Free Access
Collapse Box

Author Information

School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Medicine, Ohio State University and Sports Health and Performance Institute, Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH

School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Medicine, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

This article presents reference values for the Muscle Power Sprint Test (MPST) in children aged 6 to 12 years who are developing typically. The MPST involves 6 timed 15-m sprints. Reference curves for mean power, a measure of anaerobic performance, are presented for boys and girls separately. Mean power is defined as the average power output (force × velocity) for 6 sprints. The authors indicate good test-retest reliability for the MPST. The authors indicate that the MPST is an easy and reliable method to test anaerobic performance and may be used to identify children requiring specific exercise-based interventions.

“How should I apply this information?”

The MPST is an easily applied sprint test that requires one assessor, a way to delineate 15 m, and a stop watch. Results can be used directly in clinical practice to look up reference values for mean power in 6- to 12-year-old children. The relationships of height and gender are considered. The use of this tool and centile curves are most applicable as a screening tool to see whether children fall below the 25th percentile and therefore should receive further evaluation. It can be used in most clinical settings, including large cohorts or a school system. The MPST has potential applicability for other conditions that affect children's anaerobic performance and may assist in providing general physical activity recommendations.

“What should I be mindful about when applying this information?”

Clinicians should be mindful that values are not reference standards for speed on a 15-m sprint but percentile curves of mean power. The MPST was designed and validated initially in children with cerebral palsy. Body mass index is used only to categorize the participant's body composition and therefore could limit assessments for different weight categories and the interpretation of their performance on the MPST. The test cannot be used to discern higher or lower levels of anaerobic performance, the effect of individual growth, development or training, or the performance of children younger than 6 years or older than 12 years. Some anthropometrics known to be important in sprinting speed, such as foot length, were not considered.

Matthew Briggs, DPT, SCS, ATC

School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Medicine, Ohio State University

and Sports Health and Performance Institute, Ohio State University Medical Center

Columbus, OH

Jill C. Heathcock, MPT, PhD

School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Medicine, Ohio State University

Columbus, OH

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

© 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

Login

Article Tools

Share

Follow PED-PT on Twitter