Pediatric Physical Therapy:
doi: 10.1097/PEP.0b013e3182289856
Announcements: Section Information

Announcements

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UPCOMING MEETINGS

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Combined Sections Meetings

2012: Chicago, IL, February 8–11

2013: Nashville, TN, February 20–23

2014: Las Vegas, NV, February 3–6

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Annual Conference

2012: Tampa, FL, June 6–9

2013: Salt Lake City, UT, June 26–29

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Section on Pediatrics Annual Conference (SOPAC)

2011: Anaheim, CA, August 30–September 4

2012: Orlando, FL, October 5–8

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GRANTS FOR CLINICAL RESEARCH

Clinical research grants are available to Section members to assist with a one-year research study that investigates a question or questions of importance to pediatric physical therapy. The purpose of the grants is to provide funding to assist primarily new physical therapist investigators and to encourage research that will add to the body of knowledge related to improvement of pediatric physical therapy.

Details on grant submission can be found on the Section Web site at www.pediatricapta.org under Research & Awards. The due dates for submission are April 1 and September 1. Grants are awarded in the amounts of $5,000 and $10,000 twice per year to support post-professional research (monies not awarded after the April submission reviews may be awarded to September submissions). The Section also awards a $30,000 planning grant on a topic that is announced each summer. Details of all the grants can be found online.

To request application guidelines, visit the Web site or contact the Section on Pediatrics Executive Office at 1111 North Fairfax St, Alexandria, VA 22314-1488; 800/999- 2782, Ext 3254; e-mail: pediatrics@apta.org. Any questions concerning your proposal may be sent to the current Section on Pediatrics Research Committee Chair, listed in the current issue of the Section on Pediatrics newsletter or on the Website at www.pediatricapta.org under Contact Us.

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RESEARCH AWARD

The Research Committee of the Section on Pediatrics is pleased to announce a call for nominees for the Section's Research Award. The Research Award is given to recognize a Section on Pediatrics memberwho has performed sustained and outstanding basic, clinical, and/or education research pertaining to pediatric physical therapy. Evidence must be given that the published body of research makes a meaningful contribution to the scientific basis of pediatric physical therapy. In addition, evidence of one or more of the following contributions should be provided: 1) oral presentations and written articles of the research have been reported to the appropriate audiences, 2) an active attempt to foster research of others, and 3) work has been recognized by receipt of grants. Further details can be found on the Section Web site at www.pediatricapta.org under Research & Awards. Submit the name and address of the nominee along with a curriculum vitae and the requested evidence. The deadline for nominations is November 1. The Research Award is presented to the recipient at the business meeting of the Section on Pediatrics during the Combined Section Meeting. Nominations should be sent to the Section on Pediatrics Executive Office at 1111 North Fairfax St, Alexandria, VA 22314-1488 or via e-mail to pediatrics@apta.org.

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THESIS AND DISSERTATION AWARDS

The Thesis Award is given as recognition to an active or student member of the Section on Pediatrics who has completed an outstanding research project as partial fulfillment for a master's degree. The Dissertation Award is given as recognition to an active or student member of the Section on Pediatrics who has completed an outstanding research project as partial fulfillment for a doctoral degree. Submission details can be found on the Section Web site at www.pediatricapta.org under Research & Awards. The deadline for submission is November 1. The thesis and dissertation awards are presented to the recipients at the business meeting of the Section on Pediatrics during the Combined Section Meeting. Submissions should be sent to the Section on Pediatrics Executive Office at 1111 North Fairfax St, Alexandria, VA 22314-1488 or via e-mail to pediatrics@apta.org. Any questions concerning your application may be sent to the current Section on Pediatrics Research Committee Chair, listed in the current issue of the Section on Pediatrics newsletter or on the Web site at www.pediatricapta.org under Contact Us.

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EVALUATION OF ALBERTA INFANT MOTOR SCALE (AIMS) NORMATIVE DATA UNDERWAY

The AIMS, published in 1994, was developed to assess the gross motor abilities of infants from birth to independent walking. The age-referenced normative data represents 2202 infants 1 week to 18 months of age born in the province of Alberta between 1990 and 1992. The AIMS has received international recognition as a clinical screening measurement tool, a research outcome measure and an educational tool.

Johanna Darrah, PT, PhD, and Doreen Bartlett, PT, PhD, have received funding from the Canadian government to re-evaluate the published norms. Two issues prompted this re-evaluation. The first issue is the discussion in the literature that the “back to sleep” campaigns introduced in 1992 in Canada to decrease the prevalence of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) may have influenced the age of emergence of infant motor abilities, especially those developing from experience in the prone position such as rolling prone to supine and head control in prone. If these motor abilities do now emerge at older ages, the ages of attainment of some items on the AIMS may need to be adjusted. The second issue is that the present norms do not reflect the contemporary ethno-cultural diversity of Canada. Between 1991 and 2006 the visible minority population in Canada doubled from 2.5 million (9.4% of the national population) to over 5.0 million individuals (16.2%). The specific influence of cultural and ethnic differences on gross motor abilities is difficult to establish from the literature. Current discussion in the literature highlights the confounding influences of factors such as cultural practices, nutrition, environment, mixed ethnicities, and socioeconomic status. The objective of the investigators' present project is not to test for differences in motor abilities among infants from visible minority populations, but rather to evaluate the validity of the present norms for a more culturally diverse population.

The investigators will assess 675 infants with proportional representation from visible minority and first nation families from 6 cities across Canada (Vancouver, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Montreal, Halifax). Infants born preterm will be proportionally represented by their gestational age. Each infant will have one assessment, and assessment ages will be allocated into the same 3 age categories used in the original normative project (22 weeks or less, 23 to 36 weeks, and 37 weeks or more). The investigators are fortunate that the statistician involved with the original normative project has agreed to analyze the data. He will use a modified logistic regression model, similar to a Rasch analysis, to determine if the ages of attainment of items are similar or different to the original dataset. If they are different, the present norms will be recalibrated to reflect the information gained from the scores of the present sample. If they are the same, no changes will be made. For reliability and validity purposes, the AIMS items will remain the same.

Drs. Darrah and Bartlett wanted to share news of this project with readers of Pediatric Physical Therapy because they have received e-mails from clinicians learning about the study who are concerned that the present normative data and the book are “out of date” and should not be used. Darrah and Bartlett suggest that the present normative data are still robust, and they will publish any changes to these norms when they become available in 2013. Meanwhile, they encourage the use of the AIMS in its current form.

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NEONATOLOGY SUBSPECIALTY RECOGNITION AND FELLOWSHIP TRAINING

Neonatology became a recognized subspecialty area in pediatric physical therapy by the American Board of Physical Therapy Residency and Fellowship Education in November 2010. The development of neonatology fellowship opportunities for physical therapists with pediatric experience is underway. Emerging neonatology fellowship programs (6–12 month duration) targeted for 2012 include (1) Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions partnering with Seattle Children's Hospital (Seattle, WA) and Primary Children's Hospital (Salt Lake City, UT) and (2) Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA). For further information on neonatology fellowship applications and fellowship site development assistance, contact Jane Sweeney, Neonatology Special Interest Group secretary at apgar10@harbornet.com.

© 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

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