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Interventions for Gait Training in Children With Spinal Cord Impairments: A Scoping Review

Funderburg, Sarah E. PT, DPT; Josephson, Hannah E. PT, DPT; Price, Ashlee A. PT, DPT; Russo, Maredith A. PT, DPT; Case, Laura E. PT, DPT, MS, PCS

doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000446
Research Reports

Purpose: This is a scoping review of the literature on interventions for gait in individuals with pediatric spinal cord impairments.

Summary of Key Points: Four categories of interventions were identified: orthoses/assistive devices, electrical stimulation, treadmill training, and infant treadmill stepping.

Conclusions: Studies on orthotic intervention, electrical stimulation, and treadmill training reported benefits for various components of gait. The majority of articles (77%) were classified as levels of evidence III and IV.

Clinical Recommendations: Each intervention targeted specific outcomes; therefore, it is important to identify individual patient characteristics and goals appropriate for each intervention to guide clinical practice. Determining the appropriate orthotic support for each child, and incorporating treadmill training or electrical stimulation, is recommended.

This is a scoping review of the literature on interventions for gait in individuals with pediatric spinal cord impairments.

Doctor of Physical Therapy Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.

Correspondence: Sarah Funderburg, PT, DPT, 2200 W Main St, Durham, NC 27705 (sfunderburg@ghs.org).

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citation appears in the printed text and is provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (www.pedpt.com).

At the time this article was written Sarah Funderburg, Hannah Josephson, Ashlee Price, and Maredith Russo were students in the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. and Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association. All rights reserved.