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Gross Motor Outcomes After Dynamic Weight-Bearing in 2 Children With Trunk Hypotonia: A Case Series

Ardolino, Elizabeth PT, PhD; Flores, Megan PT, MPT; Manella, Kathleen PT, PhD

doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000449
Case Reports

Introduction: Children with trunk hypotonia may have limited ability to maintain an upright weight-bearing position, resulting in decreased postural control and a delay in achieving gross motor milestones.

Purpose: The purpose of this case series is to report the effect of a home-based dynamic standing program on postural control and gross motor activity in 2 children with trunk hypotonia.

Descriptions: Child 1 (aged 24 months, Gross Motor Function Classification Scale Level IV) and Child 2 (aged 21 months, Gross Motor Function Classification Scale Level V) participated in a standing program using the Upsee harness at home 3 days per week for 12 weeks.

Outcomes: Both children improved their gross motor function, and Child 1 demonstrated improved trunk control in sitting.

What this case adds: The use of the Upsee harness was an effective intervention for these children with trunk hypotonia to achieve weight-bearing and improve gross motor abilities.

This case series is a report of the impact of a home-based dynamic standing program on postural control and gross motor activity in 2 children with trunk hypotonia.

Doctor of Physical Therapy Program, University of St Augustine for Health Sciences, Austin, Texas.

Correspondence: Elizabeth Ardolino, PT, PhD, Doctor of Physical Therapy Program, University of St Augustine for Health Sciences, 5401 LaCrosse Ave, Austin, TX 78739 (eardolino@usa.edu).

At the time this article was written, Megan Flores was a PhD student at Texas Woman's University, Houston, Texas.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (www.pedpt.com).

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. and Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association. All rights reserved.