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Effects of a Program for Improving Biomechanical Characteristics During Walking and Running in Children Who Are Obese

Steinberg, Nili PhD; Rubinstein, Meron PhD; Nemet, Dan MD; Ayalon, Moshe PhD; Zeev, Aviva MSc; Pantanowitz, Michal PhD; Brosh, Tamar PhD; Eliakim, Alon MD

doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000440
Research Reports

Purpose: To investigate the influence of a weight-reduction program with locomotion-emphasis on improving biomechanical characteristics of children who are obese (OW).

Methods: Ten children who are OW participated in a 6-month multidisciplinary childhood obesity management program (GRP1); another 10 children who are OW participated in the same multidisciplinary childhood obesity management program with additional locomotion-emphasis exercises for improving biomechanical characteristics (GRP2); and 10 control children who are OW with no intervention program. Outcomes were anthropometric measurements and temporal and foot pressure parameters.

Results: GRP2 had significantly improved foot pressure in the different walking/running speeds compared with GRP1. In the temporal parameters, pretests by speed by group interactions were significantly improved for GRP2 compared with GRP1.

Conclusions: We found evidence to support beneficial effects of combined dietary and physical activity/locomotion-emphasis exercises on the movement characteristics of children who are OW.

To investigate the influence of a weight-reduction program with locomotion-emphasis on improving biomechanical characteristics of children who are obese.

The Wingate College of Physical Education and Sport Sciences (Drs Steinberg, Rubinstein, Ayalon, and Zeev), Wingate Institute, Netanya, Israel; Child Health and Sport Center (Drs Nemet, Pantanowitz, and Eliakim), Pediatric Department, Meir Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel; Department of Oral Biology (Dr Brosh), School of Dental Medicine, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel.

Correspondence: Nili Steinberg, PhD, Wingate College of Physical Education and Sports Sciences, Wingate Institute, Netanya, Israel (knopp@wincol.ac.il).

The first two authors (Steinberg N; Rubinstein M) contributed equally to this work and should be considered first authors.

The authors thank the chief scientist of the Israeli Ministry of Health for partial funding of the research through the Ministry of Health Fund (3-3002). This study was done as part of the PhD requirements submitted to the senate of Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Israel, by Meron Rubinstein.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citation appears in the printed text and is provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (www.pedpt.com).

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. and Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association. All rights reserved.