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Creative Dance Practice Improves Postural Control in a Child With Cerebral Palsy

Stribling, Kate PT, DPT, PCS; Christy, Jennifer PT, PhD

doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000450
Case Reports

Purpose: To investigate the effect of creative dance instruction on postural control and balance in an 11-year-old with spastic triplegic cerebral palsy, Gross Motor Function Classification Scale level II.

Descriptions: We conducted 1-hour dance interventions twice weekly for 8 weeks, with a focus on somatosensory awareness and movement in all planes of motion. Computerized dynamic posturography using the SMART Balance Master/EquiTest (NeuroCom) was used to assess postural control and balance reactions before the first class and following the final class.

Outcomes: Gains in standing stability, balance recovery, directional control, and endpoint excursion of movement were found. Participation in creative dance lessons appears to improve somatosensory effectiveness and postural control in a child with cerebral palsy.

What This Case Adds: Dance is a fun way to improve balance and coordination. These interventions could be easily implemented into programs for children with cerebral palsy.

To investigate the effect of creative dance instruction on postural control and balance in an 11-year-old with spastic triplegic cerebral.

Portland Public Schools (Dr Stribling), Portland, Oregon; University of Alabama at Birmingham (Dr Christy), Birmingham, Alabama.

Correspondence: Kate Stribling, PT, DPT, PCS, Motor Development Team, Jefferson High School, 5210 North Kerby Avenue Portland, Oregon 97217 (stribke@gmail.com).

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citation appears in the printed text and is provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (www.pedpt.com).

At the time this research was conducted, Kate Stribling was a student physical therapist in the process of obtaining her doctor of physical therapy (DPT) degree from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, in Birmingham, Alabama.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. and Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association. All rights reserved.