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The Relationships Between Capacity and Performance in Youths With Cerebral Palsy Differ for GMFCS Levels

Ho, Pei-Chi MSc; Chang, Chia-Hsieh MD; Granlund, Mats PhD; Hwang, Ai-Wen PT, PhD

Pediatric Physical Therapy:
doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000332
Research Reports
Abstract

Purpose: To examine change in, and longitudinal relationships between motor capacity and activity performance across the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS).

Methods: Ninety-two youths with cerebral palsy were examined at 2 time points, 1 year apart, using the Gross Motor Function Measure–66 (GMFM-66) for motor capacity, and the Chinese version of the Activities Scale for Kids-Performance Version (ASKp-C) for activity performance. The score changes and capacity-to-performance/performance-to-capacity pathways were explored across GMFCS levels.

Results: The GMFM-66 scores declined over time in GMFCS levels IV-V while ASKp-C scores increased in GMFCS level I. The correlations for both pathways in GMFCS levels I, III, and IV-V were significant with a higher correlation for performance-to-capacity pathway in GMFCS levels IV-V.

Conclusions: Longitudinal changes in and relationships between capacity and performance differ between GMFCS levels. The opportunities to perform activities need to be emphasized in GMFCS levels IV-V.

In Brief

An examination of change in, and longitudinal relationships between motor capacity and activity performance across the Gross Motor Function Classification System.

Author Information

Department of Pediatric Orthopedics (Ms Ho and Dr Chia-Hsieh Chang), Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, and Graduate Institute of Early Intervention, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University & Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Dr Hwang), Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, (Dr Hwang), Tao-Yuan, Taiwan; and CHILD (Dr Granlund), Swedish Institute of Disability Research, School of Health Science, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.

Correspondence: Ai-Wen Hwang, PT, PhD, Graduate Institute of Early Intervention, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Rd, Kweishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan (awhwang@mail.cgu.edu.tw).

Dr. Chang and Ms. Ho made equal contributions to the manuscript.

Grant support: This study was funded by the National Science Council of Taiwan (No.101-2314-B-182A-004-MY3; NSC 102-2628-B-182-001-MY3).

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. and Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association. All rights reserved.