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Power-Up: Exploration and Play in a Novel Modified Ride-On Car for Standing

Logan, Samuel W. PhD; Lobo, Michele A. PT, PhD; Feldner, Heather A. PT, PhD, PCS; Schreiber, Melynda MS; MacDonald, Megan PhD; Winden, Haylee N. BS; Stoner, Tracy PT, DPT, PCS; Galloway, James Cole PT, PhD

doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000336
Research Reports

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare the physical activity and play behaviors of preschoolers without disabilities and 1 preschooler with physical disability.

Methods: Participants were 42 preschoolers without disabilities and 1 preschooler with physical disability (Child A). Child A used either crutches or a modified ride-on car while in the gymnasium and playground.

Results: In the gymnasium, Child A engaged in less solitary play and more parallel play while using the modified ride-on car compared with crutches. On the playground, Child A engaged in more sitting and less running while using crutches compared with preschoolers without disabilities. On the playground, Child A engaged in more peer interaction and less teacher interaction when using the modified ride-on car compared with crutches.

Conclusions: For children with disabilities who may use assistive devices, clinicians, families, and teachers are encouraged to embrace a “right device, right time, right place” approach.

This study compared the physical activity and play behaviors of preschoolers without disabilities and one preschooler with physical disability.

Social Mobility Lab and PlayTech Workshop (Dr Logan and Ms Winden) and Children and Youth with Disabilities Lab (Dr MacDonald), College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis; Move to Learn Innovation Lab (Dr Lobo) and Pediatric Mobility Lab and Design Studio (Dr Galloway), Department of Physical Therapy and Biomechanics and Movement Sciences Program (Dr Stoner), University of Delaware, Newark; Department of Mechanical Engineering (Dr Feldner), University of Washington, Seattle; and Ergonomics and Safety Lab (Ms Schreiber), Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Utah, Salk Lake City.

Correspondence: Samuel W. Logan, PhD, Social Mobility Lab and PlayTech Workshop, College of Public Health and Human Services, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (sam.logan@oregonstate.edu).

Grant Support: This study was funded by the Unidel Foundation.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citation appears in the printed text and is provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (www.pedpt.com)

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. and Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association. All rights reserved.