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Leisure Participation Patterns of Children With Movement Impairments in New Zealand

Kanagasabai, Parimala S. MPT; Mulligan, Hilda PhD; Mirfin-Veitch, Brigit PhD; Hale, Leigh A. PhD

doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000334
Research Reports

Purpose: To investigate the leisure participation patterns of children with movement impairments in New Zealand.

Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted with children with movement impairments aged 6 to 12 years using the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data.

Results: Children participated in an average of 57.3% of activities, with a greater number and frequency of recreational, social, and self-improvement activities as compared with skill-based and physical activities. Children performed nearly 50% of activities with family and 13% of activities with friends. Approximately 50% of activities were performed at home and 50% of activities were performed outside the home.

Conclusions: Children with movement impairments participated in diverse leisure activities. However, reduced involvement in physical activities needs further investigation to identify the actual level of physical exertion, barriers faced, and how increased opportunities for regular physical activity could be instigated.

An investigation of the leisure participation patterns of children with movement impairments in New Zealand.

Centre for Health, Activity and Rehabilitation Research (Mrs Kanagasabai and Drs Mulligan and Hale), School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago, New Zealand; and Donald Beasley Institute (Dr Mirfin-Veitch), Dunedin, New Zealand.

Correspondence: Hilda Mulligan, PhD, School of Physiotherapy, PO Box 56, Dunedin 9016, New Zealand (hilda.mulligan@otago.ac.nz).

Grant Support: This study was supported by grants from Wilson Home Trust, New Zealand, and Physiotherapy Research Fund Grant-in-Aid, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago, New Zealand.

At the time this article was written, Parimala S. Kanagasabai was a PhD student at Centre for Health, Activity and Rehabilitation Research, School of Physiotherapy, University of Otago, New Zealand.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. and Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association. All rights reserved.