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Habitual Physical Activity in Children With Cerebral Palsy Aged 4 to 5 Years Across All Functional Abilities

Keawutan, Piyapa MSc; Bell, Kristie L. PhD; Oftedal, Stina APD; Davies, Peter S. W. PhD; Ware, Robert S. PhD; Boyd, Roslyn N. PhD

doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000327
Research Reports

Purpose: To compare ambulatory status in children with cerebral palsy aged 4 to 5 years with their habitual physical activity and time spent sedentary, and to compare their activity with physical activity guidelines.

Methods: Sixty-seven participants—independently ambulant, marginally ambulant, and nonambulant—wore accelerometers for 3 days. Time spent sedentary as a percentage of wear time and activity counts were compared between groups.

Results: There were significant differences in time spent sedentary and activity counts between groups. Children who were independently ambulant were more likely to meet physical activity guidelines.

Conclusion: Children with cerebral palsy spent more than half of their waking hours in sedentary time. Interventions to reduce sedentary behavior and increase habitual physical activity are needed in children with cerebral palsy at age 4 to 5 years.

A comparison of ambulatory status in children with cerebral palsy aged 4-5 years using their habitual physical activity and time spent sedentary, and comparing their activity with physical activity guidelines.

Queensland Cerebral Palsy and Rehabilitation Research Centre, UQ Child Health Research Centre (Mss Keawutan and Oftedal and Drs Bell and Boyd), Children's Nutrition Research Centre (Ms Oftedal and Dr Davies), Queensland Centre for Intellectual and Developmental Disability (Dr Ware), The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; Dietetics and Food Services (Dr Bell), Lady Cilento Children's Hospital, Children's Health Queensland, South Brisbane, Australia; Menzies Health Institute Queensland (Dr Ware), Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia.

Correspondence: Piyapa Keawutan, MSc, Queensland Cerebral Palsy and Rehabilitation Research Centre, The University of Queensland, Centre for Children's Health Research, 62 Graham St, South Brisbane, Queensland 4101, Australia (piyapa.keawutan@uqconnect.edu.au).

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. and Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association. All rights reserved.