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Effects of Combined Exercise Training on Functional Performance in Children With Cerebral Palsy: A Randomized-Controlled Study

Peungsuwan, Punnee PhD; Parasin, Pattamavadee MSc; Siritaratiwat, Wantana PhD; Prasertnu, Jilada BSc; Yamauchi, Junichiro PhD

doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000338
Research Reports

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of combined exercise training on functional performance in participants with cerebral palsy.

Methods: Fifteen participants with spastic cerebral palsy were randomly allocated into either exercise or control groups. Participants in the exercise group participated in a combined strength and endurance training program for 70 minutes per day, 3 days per week, for 8 weeks, whereas those in the control group did not participate in an exercise program. Study participants in both groups continued with their regular physical therapy during the study.

Results: After the 8-week training, a 6-minute walk, 30-second sit-to-stand, 10-m walk, and Functional Reach Tests, participants in the exercise group had significant improvement over their baseline values and were significantly higher than those in the control group.

Conclusions: Combined exercise training improved walking ability, functional lower limb strength, and balance in participants with cerebral palsy.

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of combined exercise training on functional performance in children with cerebral palsy.

Research Center in Back, Neck, Other Joint Pain and Human Performance (BNOJPH), Khon Kaen University, Thailand (Drs Peungsuwan, Siritaratiwat, and Yamauchi); School of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Thailand (Drs Peungsuwan and Siritaratiwat); Physical Therapy Department, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, University of Phayao, Thailand (Ms Parasin); Srisangwan Khon Kaen Special School, Thailand (Ms Prasertnu); Graduate School of Human Health Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan (Dr Yamauchi); Future Institute for Sport Sciences, Tokyo, Japan (Dr Yamauchi).

Correspondence: Punnee Peungsuwan, PhD, School of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, 123 Mittraphap Highway, Muang District, Khon Kaen Province 40002, Thailand (ppunne@kku.ac.th).

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. and Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association. All rights reserved.