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Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Children With Brain Tumors

Sparrow, Jessica OTD, OTR/L; Zhu, Liang PhD; Gajjar, Amar MD; Mandrell, Belinda N. PhD, RN; Ness, Kirsten K. PT, PhD

doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000331
Research Reports

Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of a 3-week constraint-induced movement therapy program in children with brain tumors and upper extremity hemiplegia and to describe resultant change in extremity use.

Methods: Affected arm use, health-related quality of life, and parent-reported feasibility of program participation were measured before and after the intervention and at a 3-month follow-up visit.

Results: All 9 participants completed the entire study. The quality and amount of affected arm use improved significantly; gains were maintained at the 3-month follow-up evaluation. Some parents (44%) reported that program participation was difficult; however, all reported satisfaction with the program. Participants did not experience negative changes in health-related quality of life during the intervention, indicating that they tolerated the program well.

Conclusions: Findings suggest that a child with hemiplegia as a result of a brain tumor can adhere to and benefit from a constraint-induced movement therapy program.

The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of a 3-week constraint-induced movement therapy program in children with brain tumors and upper extremity hemiplegia and to describe resultant change in extremity use.

Rehabilitation Services (Dr Sparrow), Department of Biostatistics (Dr Zhu), Department of Oncology (Dr. Gajjar), Department of Pediatric Medicine (Dr Mandrell), and Department of Epidemiology & Cancer Control (Dr Ness), St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee.

Correspondence: Jessica Sparrow, OTD, OTR/L, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38106 (Jessica.sparrow@stjude.org).

Grant Support: This work was supported by ALSAC.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. and Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association. All rights reserved.