Physical Therapy for a Child With Sudden-Onset Choreoathetosis: A Case Report

Smith, Hilary J. PT, DPT

Pediatric Physical Therapy:
doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000010
Case Report
Abstract

Purpose: This case report describes the physical therapy examination, intervention, and outcomes for a 5-year-old girl who developed choreoathetosis following mitral valve repair.

Case Description: This child was admitted to an inpatient short-term rehabilitation program with marked choreoathetosis and dependence for all functional mobility. She received physical therapy twice a day for 5 weeks. Physical therapy intervention included therapeutic exercise emphasizing stabilization and closed chain exercises, aquatic therapy, and functional training to improve gross motor skills and mobility. Tests and measures included the Selective Control Assessment of the Lower Extremity, 66-item Gross Motor Function Measure, and Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory.

Outcomes: At discharge, this child demonstrated improvements in her Selective Control Assessment of the Lower Extremity, Gross Motor Function Measure, and Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory scores. She was independent in all functional mobility tasks.

Summary: This case study describes physical therapy tests and measures, intervention, and positive outcomes for a child with sudden-onset choreoathetosis.

In Brief

In this case report physical therapy tests and measures and intervention leading to positive outcomes for a child with sudden-onset choreoathetosis are described.

Author Information

Physical Therapy Department, Franciscan Hospital for Children, Brighton, Massachusetts.

Correspondence: Hilary J. Smith, PT, DPT, Physical Therapy Department, Franciscan Hospital for Children, Research Center, 30 Warren St, Brighton, MA 02139 (Hilary.jsmith@gmail.com).

The author declares no conflict of interest with the production of this case report.

© 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and the Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association.