Motor Competence and Physical Fitness in Adolescents

Gísladóttir, órdís MSÞ; Haga, Monika PhD; Sigmundsson, Hermundur PhD

doi: 10.1097/PEP.0000000000000006
Research Article

Purpose: In this study we examined the relationship between physical fitness and motor competence in adolescents aged 15 to 16 years.

Methods: A sample of 94 adolescents participated in the study. To test motor competence, the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-2 was used. Physical fitness was assessed using the following test items: standing broad jump, 20-m dash, reduced Cooper test, and sit-and-reach test.

Results: The results revealed a significant but weak relationship (0.248) between motor competence and physical fitness for the whole sample. More specifically, the correlation between the 2 variables was significant for girls (0.353) but not for boys (0.248).

Conclusions: The relatively weak relationship between motor competence and physical fitness suggests that motor competence might not be critical in adolescents to maintain their physical fitness.

A weak relationship between motor competence and physical fitness caused the authors to suggest that motor competence might not be critical in adolescence to maintain physical fitness.

Department of Sport Science and Physical Education (Ms Gísladóttir), Reykjavík University, Iceland; Department of Physiotherapy (Drs Haga and Sigmundsson), Faculty of Health Education and Social Work, Sør-Trøndelag University College, Trondheim, Norway; Department of Psychology (Dr Sigmundsson), Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.

Correspondence: Monika Haga, PhD, Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Education and Social Work, Sør-Trøndelag University College, Trondheim, Norway (Monika.haga@hist.no).

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

© 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and the Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association.