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Sport-Specific Fitness Testing and Intervention for an Adolescent With Cerebral Palsy: A Case Report

Kenyon, Lisa K. PT, MHS, PCS; Sleeper, Mark D. PT, MS, OCS; Tovin, Melissa M. PT, MA, PhD

doi: 10.1097/PEP.0b013e3181dba5e5
Case Report

Background and Purpose: This case report describes the development, implementation, and outcomes of a fitness-related intervention program that addressed the sport-specific goals of an adolescent with cerebral palsy.

Case Description: The participant in this case was a 16-year-old African American male with spastic diplegia. The participant joined his high school wrestling team and asked to focus his physical therapy on interventions that would improve his wrestling performance. An examination was performed using the muscle power sprint test, the 10 × 5-m sprint test, strength tests, the 10-m shuttle run test, and the Gross Motor Function Measure. The intervention consisted of interval training, which focused on the demands of wrestling.

Outcomes: Scores on all tests and measures were higher after the intervention.

Discussion: The outcomes of this case report seem to support the use of a fitness-related intervention program for addressing the sport-specific goals of an adolescent with cerebral palsy.

This case report supports the use of a fitness-related intervention program to address the sport-specific goals of an adolescent with CP related to wrestling.

Department of Physical Therapy, Arkansas State University, State University, Arkansas (Ms Kenyon); Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (Mr Sleeper); and Physical Therapy Program, Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, Florida (Dr Tovin)

Correspondence: Lisa K. Kenyon, PT, MHS, PCS, Department of Physical Therapy, Box 910, Arkansas State University, State University, AR 72467 (lkenyon@astate.edu).

This case report was completed in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a PhD degree in physical therapy for L.K. Kenyon and M.D. Sleeper.

Supplemental digital content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Web site (www.pedpt.com).

© 2010 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.