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Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics:
doi: 10.1097/BPO.0000000000000133
Spine

Patient Outcomes in the Operative and Nonoperative Management of High-Grade Spondylolisthesis in Children

Lundine, Kristopher M. MD, MSc, FRCSC*; Lewis, Stephen J. MD MSc, FRCSC*; Al-Aubaidi, Zaid MD, MB, CHB; Alman, Benjamin MD, FRCSC*; Howard, Andrew W. MD, MSc, FRCSC*

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Abstract

Background:

The optimal management of high-grade spondylolisthesis in the growing child is controversial. Some authors have advocated for surgery in all cases regardless of symptoms. Surgical intervention results in a >10% risk of complications with increased risk of neurological injury associated with slip reduction maneuvers. There is a paucity of literature regarding nonoperative management in this setting. This study sought to obtain outcome measures in pediatric patients with high-grade spondylolisthesis managed either operatively or nonoperatively.

Methods:

Database review was performed to identify patients with a high-grade (Meyerding grade III to V) spondylolisthesis managed either operatively or nonoperatively. Retrospective radiographic and chart review was performed. Patients were then contacted by phone to obtain current quality-of-life measurements using the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-30 questionnaire.

Results:

Fifty-three patients were identified for inclusion in the study and 49 were contacted for 92% follow-up. Twenty-four patients were treated with operative intervention, and 25 patients were initially treated nonoperatively, but 10 went on to require surgical intervention. Mean age at presentation was 12.6 years (range, 8 to 17 y) and mean age at follow-up was 20.1 years (range, 10 to 29 y). There were no outcome differences between the groups. A more kyphotic slip angle was associated with worse SRS-30 outcome scores across all groups. In the nonoperative group, the slip angle was significantly larger in patients who failed conservative treatment (34±17 degrees) than in those who remained nonsurgical at final follow-up (20±14 degrees). Slip angle in the operative group was 27±14 degrees. In surgical patients, an older age at surgery was associated with better SRS-30 outcome scores.

Conclusions:

Nonoperative management or “watchful waiting” of the minimally symptomatic or asymptomatic child with a high-grade spondylolisthesis is safe and does not lead to significant problems. Operative intervention for the symptomatic patient achieves similar long-term results compared with patients whose minimal symptoms do not warrant surgery. Delayed surgical intervention does not result in worse outcomes. Regardless of treatment modality, patients with a more kyphotic slip angle tend to have a poorer prognosis.

Level of Evidence:

Level III.

Copyright © 2014 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

The Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA)
is a group of healthcare professionals, primarily pediatric orthopaedic surgeons, dedicated to advancing musculoskeletal care of children and adolescents. JPO is our official member journal. 
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