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Citation Classics in Pediatric Orthopaedics

Varghese, Ranjit A. MBBS, MS (Orth), MHSc (Epi)*,†; Dhawale, Arjun A. MD*,†; Zavaglia, Bogard C. BSc; Slobogean, Bronwyn L. MPAS, PA-C*; Mulpuri, Kishore MBBS, MS (Orth), MHSc (Epi)*,†

Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics: September 2013 - Volume 33 - Issue 6 - p 667–671
doi: 10.1097/BPO.0b013e318296dfb6
Selected Topics

Background: The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical pediatric orthopaedic articles with at least 100 citations published in all orthopaedic journals and to examine their characteristics.

Methods: All journals dedicated to orthopaedics and its subspecialties were selected from the Journal Citation Report 2001 under the subject category “orthopedics.” Articles cited 100 times or more were identified using the database of the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED, 1900 to present). The articles were ranked in a comprehensive list. Two authors independently reviewed the full text of each article and applied the inclusion and exclusion criteria to the list of articles. The 2 lists were then compared. All disagreements were resolved by consensus with input from the senior author. The final list of pediatric orthopaedic articles was then compiled.

Results: There were a total of 49 journals under the search category “orthopedics.” Five journals were excluded as they were non-English journals. The remaining 44 journals were screened for articles with at least 100 citations. A total of 135 clinical pediatric orthopaedic articles cited at least 100 times were included. The most cited article was cited 692 times. The mean number of citations per article was 159 (95% confidence interval, 145-173). All the articles were published between 1949 and 2001, with 1980 and 1989 producing the most citation classics (34). The majority (90) originated from the United States, followed by the United Kingdom (12) and Canada (11). Scoliosis/kyphosis was the most common topic with 26 papers. The second most common subject was hip disorders (24). Therapeutic studies were the most common study type (71). Ninety-seven papers were assigned a 4 for level of evidence.

Conclusions: The list of citation classics in pediatric orthopaedic articles is useful for several reasons. It identifies important contributions to the field of pediatric orthopaedics and their originators; it facilitates the understanding and discourse of modern pediatric orthopaedic history and reveals trends in pediatric orthopaedics.

Level of Evidence: Unclassifiable.

*Department of Orthopedics, BC Children’s Hospital

Department of Orthopaedics, University of British Columbia

Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Supplemental Digital Content is available for this article. Direct URL citations appear in the printed text and are provided in the HTML and PDF versions of this article on the journal's Website, www.pedorthopaedics.com.

None of the authors received financial support for this study.

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Reprints: Kishore Mulpuri, MBBS, MS (Orth), MHSc (Epi), Department of Orthopaedics, BC Children’s Hospital, A207A-4480 Oak Street, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6H 3V4. E-mail: kmulpuri@cw.bc.ca.

© 2013 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins