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Fracture Dislocation of the Glenoid Fossa With Open Physis: A Case Report

Toro, Felipe G. MD; Vaisman, Alex MD; Villalón, Ignacio E. MD; Calvo, Rafael MD

Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics: June 2010 - Volume 30 - Issue 4 - pp 336-338
doi: 10.1097/BPO.0b013e3181d98f57
Trauma

Background: Scapular fractures are uncommon injuries that account for 1% of all fractures. Ten percent of these lesions involve the glenoid fossa and intraarticular displacement is rare, not exceeding 10% of the cases. The classification of intraarticular glenoid fractures was described by Ideberg on the basis of his findings in 100 patients with this type of injury. His classification, however, does not include a dislocation of the glenoid fossa without displacement of the humeral head.

Methods: We report the case of a fracture dislocation of the glenoid fossa without displacement of the humeral head in a patient with open physis. Our surgical approach and results after 6 years of follow-up.

Results: Six years postoperatively the patient has minimal occasional discomfort and a full range of motion and strength, even in external rotation. Shoulder stability is also normal. Her Constant score is 97. The fracture is actually healed clinically and radiographically with no evidence of post traumatic articular degenerative disease or avascular changes.

Conclusions: The fracture/dislocation of the glenoid fossa is an uncommon injury that can be effectively treated by open reduction and internal fixation. A posterior surgical approach was useful to achieve anatomic reduction and strong fixation in this case presentation.

Orthopaedic Surgery Department, Clínica Alemana de Santiago and Faculty of Medicine, Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago, Chile

None of the authors received financial support for this study.

Reprints: Alex Vaisman, MD, Orthopaedic Surgery Department, Clínica Alemana de Santiago and Faculty of Medicine, Universidad del Desarrollo, Avda Vitacura 5951, Vitacura; Santiago, Chile. E-mail: avaismanb@hotmail.com.

No Institutional Review Board (IRB) was needed for this case report.

This manuscript has not been earlier submitted or published elsewhere.

The manuscript has been read and approved by all authors, and each author believes that the manuscript represents honest work.

© 2010 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.