You could be reading the full-text of this article now if you...

If you have access to this article through your institution,
you can view this article in

Decompression and Stable Internal Fixation of Femoral Neck Fractures in Children Can Affect the Outcome

Cheng, Jack C. Y. F.R.C.S.E.D.(Orth.); Tang, N. M.B.Ch.B.*

Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics:
Trauma
Abstract

Pediatric femoral neck fracture is rare and known to be associated with a high complication rate. The effect of early decompression and operative fixation is not frequently reported in the literature. This is a retrospective study of 14 patients younger than 16 years with traumatic fractures of the femoral neck and intertrochanteric region over a 10-year period with a follow-up of 2-11 years (mean, 4.6 years). Road traffic accidents and falls from a height were the main causative factors, and the fractures were subclassified into transcervical, 58%; intertrochanteric, 29%; transepiphyseal, 7%; and cervicotrochanteric, 7%. Of all the fractures, 10 (71%) were displaced. Decompression of the hip by aspiration and closed reduction and internal fixation was performed for all the displaced fractures within 24 h after admission. Three cases required open reduction. Complete fracture healing and functional recovery was achieved in 13 patients with only one delayed union. No patient had radiographic evidence of avascular necrosis. When compared with earlier studies, the current aggressive management protocol for displaced fracture significantly minimized the complications of avascular necrosis, nonunion, delayed union, and premature physeal closure.

Author Information

Study conducted at the Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong

From the Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, and *Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. J. C. Y. Cheng, Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 5th Floor, Clinical Sciences Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong.

© 1999 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.