Pediatric Emergency Care

Skip Navigation LinksHome > December 2012 - Volume 28 - Issue 12 > Survey of Trauma Registry Data on Tourniquet Use in Pediatri...
Pediatric Emergency Care:
doi: 10.1097/PEC.0b013e318276c260
Original Articles

Survey of Trauma Registry Data on Tourniquet Use in Pediatric War Casualties

Kragh, John F. Jr MD*†; Cooper, Arthur MD, MS; Aden, James K. PhD*; Dubick, Michael A. PhD*; Baer, David G. PhD*; Wade, Charles E. PhD§; Blackbourne, Lorne H. MD, MC, USA*

Collapse Box

Abstract

Objectives: Previously, we reported on the use of emergency tourniquets to stop bleeding in war casualties, but virtually all the data were from adults. Because no pediatric-specific cohort of casualties receiving emergency tourniquets existed, we aimed to fill knowledge gaps on the care and outcomes of this group by surveying data from a trauma registry to refine device designs and clinical training.

Methods: A retrospective review of data from a trauma registry yielded an observational cohort of 88 pediatric casualties at US military hospitals in theater on whom tourniquets were used from May 17, 2003, to December 25, 2009.

Results: Of the 88 casualties in the study group, 72 were male and 16 were female patients. Ages averaged 11 years (median, 11 years; range, 4–17 years). There were 7 dead and 81 survivor outcomes for a trauma survival rate of 93%. Survivor and dead casualties were similar in all independent variables measured except hospital stay duration (median, 5 days and 1 day, respectively). Six casualties (7%) had neither extremity nor external injury in that they had no lesion indicating tourniquet use.

Conclusions: The survival rate of the present study’s casualties is similar to that of 3 recent large nonpediatric-specific studies. Although current emergency tourniquets were ostensibly designed for modern adult soldiers, tourniquet makers, perhaps unknowingly, produced tourniquets that fit children. The rate of unindicated tourniquets, 7%, implied that potential users need better diagnostic training.

Levels of Evidence: Level 4; case series, therapeutic study.

© 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

Login

Article Tools

Share

Article Level Metrics

Search for Similar Articles
You may search for similar articles that contain these same keywords or you may modify the keyword list to augment your search.