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Pediatric Critical Care Medicine:
doi: 10.1097/01.pcc.0000448747.40011.0b
Abstracts of the 7th World Congress on Pediatric Critical Care

ABSTRACT 18: THE EFFECT OF TWO DIFFERENT FEEDING METHODS ON PREVENTING VENTILATOR ASSOCIATED PNEUMONIA IN PAEDIATRIC INTENSIVE CARE UNITS

Düzkaya, D. Sönmez1; Yildiz, S.2

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1Department of Nursing Administration, Istanbul University Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey 2Pediatric Nursing Department, Istanbul University Florence Nightingale Nursing Faculty, Istanbul, Turkey

Background and aims: There are a number of strategies regarding the prevention of VAP, leaving nurses with great responsibility. The effectiveness of using enteral nutrition method in preventing VAP is controversial.

Aims: The research is performed to evaluate and compare the effects of intermittent feeding through a nasogastric tube with those of continuous feeding through a nasoduodenal catheter on preventing ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) in Paediatric Intensive Care Units (PICU).

Methods: The research design is a randomized, controlled experimental study. The research took place in a university hospital’s Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) between April and May 2013, after attaining the ethical board’s and the institution’s permission. All 40 child patients were randomised following the power analysis, and divided into two groups of 20: one group for nasoduodenal feeding and one group for nasogastric feeding. The gathered data were evaluated based on the statistical methods defined in the SPSS 17 program.

Results: Among the children, 50% were aged between one month and one year; 55% were male; and 35% had been admitted for neurological illnesses. No differences in features were detected between the patients that were fed nasogastrically and those fed nasoduodenally. The incidence of pediatric VAP was 15%. The rate of VAP in patients being fed nasoduodenally was 10%, whereas the rate of VAP in patients being fed nasogastrically was 20%.

Conclusions: These findings suggest that the risk factors (reintubation, transportation, and use of stress ulcer prophylactics) causing VAP in children should be known by nurses, and that patient care should be handled accordingly.

©2014The Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies

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