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Effects of alcohol-related diseases on hip fracture and mortality: A retrospective cohort study of hospitalized medicare beneficiaries.

Schoen, Delores C.

Research Update: Hip Fractures

Delores C. Schoen, PhD, RN, C, FAAN, Adjunct Professor, The Pennsylvania State University School of Nursing, University Park, PA.

Hip fractures are common, costly, and clinically serious. The following recent research articles give important information regarding hip fractures from several perspectives.

Effects of alcohol-related diseases on hip fracture and mortality: A retrospective cohort study of hospitalized medicare beneficiaries.

Yuan, Z., Dawson, N., Cooper, G. S., Einstadter, D., Cebul, R., & Rimm, A., A. (2001). American Journal of Public Health, 91(7), 1089–1093.

This retrospective cohort study of hospitalized medicare beneficiaries investigated the effect of alcohol-related disease on hip fracture and mortality. For 1988 to 1989, the investigators studied the incidence rate of hip fracture and mortality among 150,119 hospitalized beneficiaries with alcohol-related disease and 726,218 randomly matched controls without alcohol-related disease.

During the study period, 20,620 patients developed hip fracture, with 6,973 cases occurring in those without alcohol-related disease, and 13,647 cases occurring in patients with alcohol-related disease. After adjustment for potential confounders, patients with alcohol-related disease had a 2.6-fold increased risk of hip fracture compared with to patients without alcohol-related disease.

Implications for clinical practice suggest that alcohol-related disease increases the risk for hip fracture significantly and reduces long-term survival. It also suggests that patients who are hospitalized for alcohol-related disease should be targeted for hip fracture prevention programs.

© 2003 National Association of Orthopaedic Nurses