Text sizing:
A
A
A
Optometry & Vision Science:
doi: 10.1097/OPX.0b013e31828eceb6
OVS Announces

OVS Announces

Free Access
Back to Top | Article Outline

IN THIS ISSUE:

• Orthokeratology for Monovision Is Viable for Presbyopia Correction

Our authors applied hyperopic overnight orthokeratology (OK) in the nondominant eye of emmetropic presbyopes. They discovered that, like younger patients, OK is effective within a week and it reverses to baseline corneal curvature within 1 week of cessation of lens wear. The results suggest that hyperopic OK, creating steepened corneas, can provide a viable option for correcting presbyopia with monovision. (p. 306)

Figure. No caption a...
Image Tools

Editor’s Choice open access

Figure. No caption a...
Image Tools
Back to Top | Article Outline
• Customized Optical Correction of Advanced Keratoconus

Customized correction of higher order aberrations into a scleral lens produces substantial visual acuity improvement in advanced keratotonic eyes. This wavefront-guided optical design not only improved vision, but the authors report that the optical aberrations in the keratoconus eyes were also corrected to normal levels. The research offers the potential of customized scleral lenses to provide patients with abnormally aberrated corneas with nearly a normal level of optical and visual quality. (p. 314)

Figure. No caption a...
Image Tools
Back to Top | Article Outline
• Should Common Optical Corrections Be Applied to Keratoconus Patient Groups?

The authors feel that the relatively common high-order aberrations in keratoconus (KC) can be characterized in subgroups that will allow feasible correction for these subgroups. The 110 KC eyes were studied to develop templates for the subgroups. (p. 324)

Figure. No caption a...
Image Tools
Back to Top | Article Outline
• Detecting Subclinical Keratoconus with Indices Derived from Placido Images

Irregularity metrics were computed directly from the digitized images of the Placido disks reflected on the cornea of three groups of patients diagnosed as having clinical and subclinical keratoconus. There was a normal control group for comparison. The authors claim that these new corneal irregularity indices can be an effective tool for detection of keratoconic and keratoconus-suspect eyes. (p. 335)

Figure. No caption a...
Image Tools
Back to Top | Article Outline
• Contact Lens Wear Reactions from the Lens or the Solution?

Despite the increasing popularity of daily disposable lenses, planned replacement lenses continue to be most commonly prescribed. Our authors use data from seven prospective clinical trials involving 283 subjects. They report that a planned replacement silicone hydrogel contact lens, when worn on a daily disposable basis, reduces corneal surface adverse events and offers better ocular comfort compared with reusing the lens with various lens care systems. They call for further research on the topic. (p. 334)

Figure. No caption a...
Image Tools
Back to Top | Article Outline
• Contact Lens Replacement/Compliance and Regular Eye Care Examinations Go Hand in Hand

Perhaps not surprisingly, the interval between eye examinations (IEEs) is longer for patientswho are less compliant with manufacturer-recommended replacement frequency. The authors’ study also revealed that wearers of daily disposable lenses returned most frequently for eye examinations. Contact lens wearers who purchased lenses from their eye care practitioner had a higher household income, had insurance covering eye examinations, were female, and attended their practitioner for eye examinations at more regular intervals. (p. 351)

Figure. No caption a...
Image Tools
Back to Top | Article Outline
• Measuring Tear Osmolarity on the Eye

Our authors validate in situ tear osmolarity measurements by comparing the TearLab instrument with a traditional vapor pressure osmometer. On-eye measurements were repeatable and showed good agreement with vapor pressure measurements. Although tear osmolarity measured with the TearLab instrument was higher when measured on-eye than on collected tears, the authors point to the advantages of in situ measurements over techniques requiring tears to be collected. (p. 359)

Figure. No caption a...
Image Tools
Back to Top | Article Outline
• New Tear Evaporation Measure Repeatable

Our authors demonstrated repeatability for a new method to measure tear evaporation based on infrared thermography at two different humidities (45 and 65%) for a constant temperature of 30°C. (p. 366)

Figure. No caption a...
Image Tools
Back to Top | Article Outline
• Effectiveness of Two Commercial Eyedrops in Reducing Tear Osmolarity

Reducing tear osmolarity in dry eye patients is a desirable goal. Each of 20 consecutive patients with moderate dry eye administered one of the commercial eyedrops on the right eye and the other on the left eye. The drops were administered this same way three times daily for 21 consecutive days. Both eyedrops showed significantly lower tear osmolarity soon after instillation of the drops and on day 22, one day after the subjects stopped using the drops. However, hypo-osmotic drops with sodium hyaluronate reduced tear osmolarity at a greater and more sustained rate than the osmoprotectants glycerin- and carboxymethylcellulose-based drops. (p. 372)

Figure. No caption a...
Image Tools
Back to Top | Article Outline
• A Case of Uncorrected Astigmatism in Pseudophakes

They found that uncorrected astigmatism of up to 1 D in 15 otherwise emmetropic pseudophakic eyes implanted with monofocal intraocular lenses improves near vision while reducing distance vision. In contrast, uncorrected myopic astigmatism more than 1 D results in a large loss of distance acuity at no additional benefit to near acuity. The authors suggest that leaving myopic astigmatism slightly uncorrected after cataract surgery may be a cost-effective strategy for improving near vision of elderly pseudophakes where conventional forms of spherocylindrical bifocal corrections are not readily available or are too expensive. (p. 378)

Figure. No caption a...
Image Tools
Back to Top | Article Outline
• Caution Advised in Choice of Toric IOL

Consistent astigmatism correction with implantation of a toric intraocular lens (IOL) requires accurate preoperative keratometry. This article compares agreement between an autokeratometer (Topcon KR-7100) and a partial coherence interferometry keratometer (IOLMaster 500) in estimating corneal astigmatism. Although the keratometers were generally concordant, the choice of toric IOL cylinder power differed appreciably in 40% of eyes examined, suggesting to the authors that, where there is a consistent difference in IOL power predicted by two different instruments, verification is needed using a more robust technique such as corneal topography. (p. 385)

Figure. No caption a...
Image Tools
Back to Top | Article Outline
• Patient Perceptions of Vision Disability and General Health After Bilateral Cataract Surgery

Bilateral cataract surgery improves measured vision but not general health (assessed by the CatQuest-9SF [nine-item Rasch-scaled version of the Cataract Questionnaire] and the Short Formular-36), Our authors followed 148 patients before, at 6 weeks after surgery, and 1 year later. Physical and mental health improved after surgery but had returned to presurgery levels after 12 months. The authors also report some mismatch between measured vision and the assessment of vision disability assessed using the shortened CatQuest-9SF. (p. 392)

Figure. No caption a...
Image Tools
Back to Top | Article Outline
• Risk Factors for Myopia in Taiwanese Children Younger than 12 Years

By age 11 years, almost 50% of children in Taiwan are myopic (at least -1 D). Our authors studied almost 2000 elementary school children (aged 6 to 11 years in grades 1 to 6) and found that, of the 20 myopization factors they looked at, two-thirds (66%) of refractive error were associated with just four of those myopization factors. Those associated with a decrease in myopic refractive error were daily outdoor spectacle wear, spectacles for different working distances, and weekend outdoor physical activities. (p. 400)

Figure. No caption a...
Image Tools
Back to Top | Article Outline
• Treating Pigment Epithelium Iris Cyst with Trabeculoplasty Laser

Management of iris cysts is not yet clearly defined, having many different treatments. Detection is often difficult because they are hidden. Our authors report a case of a peripheral pigment epithelium iris cyst successfully treated with selective trabeculoplasty laser, noting it as a potentially useful and relatively less invasive technique. (p. e106)

Figure. No caption a...
Image Tools
Back to Top | Article Outline
• Metamorphopsia and Choroidal Excavation Differences: Clues to Pathogenesis

Symptomatic and morphological differences between focal choroidal excavations suggest anatomical alterations between the photoreceptor tips and the retinal pigment epithelium or location of choroidal excavation as the cause of reported metamorphopsia. Using two different clinical cases, the authors propose that pathogenesis of focal choroidal excavation involves outward traction on the macula caused by choroidal vascular abnormalities because of failed embryonic development. The availability of spectral-domain optical coherence topography will likely increase the understanding of this condition. (p. e110)

Figure. No caption a...
Image Tools
Back to Top | Article Outline
• Intraocular Yolk Sac Tumor Misdiagnosed as Retinoblastoma

A case of intraocular yolk sac tumor (YST) is misdiagnosed as retinoblastoma by several hospitals. Ultimately, the absence of calcification distinguished this condition as YST. The correct diagnosis is important for timely treatment of a dangerous condition. The patient, 1 year after treatment, at 3 years old, is in good health. (p. e119)

Figure. No caption a...
Image Tools

© 2013 American Academy of Optometry

Login