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Efficacy of Contact Lens Multipurpose Solutions Against Serratia Marcescens

HUME, EMMA B. H. PhD; ZHU, HUA PhD; COLE, NERIDA PhD; HUYNH, CAFA BOptom; LAM, SHIRLEY Boptom; WILLCOX, MARK D. P. PhD

Optometry and Vision Science: April 2007 - Volume 84 - Issue 4 - p 316-320
doi: 10.1097/OPX.0b013e3180465543
Original Article

Purpose. To compare the susceptibilities of clinical isolates of Serratia marcescens and the standard ISO ATCC 13880 strain to five contact lens multipurpose disinfection solutions (MPDSs).

Methods. Five commercially available MPDSs, containing either a polymeric biguanide or polyquaternium, were tested using ISO/CD 14729 stand-alone test for contact lens care products against four ocular isolates of S. marcescens and the strain ATCC 13880. An average log reduction in bacterial numbers at the manufacturer's minimum recommended disinfection time was determined and compared with the criteria for stand-alone disinfection products for each MPDS against each bacterial strain.

Results. All the MPDSs tested met the stand-alone criteria of 3-log reduction of viable bacteria against the ATCC strain of S. marcescens. However, there was more variability in their ability to meet disinfection criteria when tested against the clinical isolates. Two of the clinical isolates were significantly more resistant to disinfection than was the recommended ISO strain (p ≤ 0.034). Two of the polyquaternium-1-based disinfection solutions (solutions D and E, p ≤ 0.005) were less effective overall than the other MPDSs against S. marcescens.

Conclusions. The importance of strain selection for the testing of MPDSs is indicated, and the use of a single laboratory strain may be insufficient to provide assurance that the disinfection solution will be effective against clinical isolates. Furthermore, clinical isolates of S. marcescens may show increased resistance to disinfection with polyquaternium.

Institute for Eye Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia (EBHH, HZ, NC, MDPW), School of Optometry and Vision Science, The University of New South Wales, New South Wales, Australia (EBHH, CH, SL), and Vision Cooperative Research Centre, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia (EBHH, HZ, NC, MDPW)

Vision CRC is an Australian Commonwealth funded cooperative research center and under its conditions of funding Vision CRC is required to commercialize its research. As part of that commercialization activity, Vision CRC receives royalty income from the sale of silicon hydrogel contact lenses sold by Bausch & Lomb and CIBA Vision. The Institute for Eye Research (IER) is a not for profit research corporation that is a core participant in Vision CRC and its employees are entitled to benefit from such royalties.

Received August 15, 2006; accepted October 20, 2006.

© 2007 American Academy of Optometry