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Eric Rosenthal Reports
Thoughts and observations about issues, trends, and controversies in the cancer community.
Wednesday, March 19, 2014
Personalizing Personalized Medicine for Better Health Care Coverage

 
I will be attending the Association of Health Care Journalists (AHCJ) annual conference next week in Denver, and this will be my fourth year organizing and moderating a workshop for journalists on medical or scientific subjects with close ties to oncology.

 

In 2011, I led a panel on nanotechnology; in 2012, on translational research; last year, on cancer registries; and this year the topic is “Getting Personal -- The Medical and Ethical Challenges of Using Genetic Information.”

 

The three panelists, who will discuss a spectrum of medical and ethical issues related to personalized medicine, are:

 

 

 

  • Bryan R. Haugen, MD, Professor of Medicine and Pathology; Chief of the Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism & Diabetes; and Director of the Thyroid Tumor Program at the University of Colorado (and coincidentally featured in an article in OT’s March 25 Thyroid Cancer Special Edition, discussing upcoming new guidelines for differentiated thyroid cancer);

 

  •  Carl Morrison, MD, DVM, Executive Director of the Center for Personalized Medicine; Clinical Chief of the Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine; Director of the Division of Molecular Pathology; and Director of the Pathology Resource Network at Roswell Park Cancer Institute; and

 

  • Rebecca D. Pentz, PhD, Professor of Research Ethics at Emory University School of Medicine.

Journalists responsible for disseminating medical news and information to the general public as well as to more specialized audiences will benefit from these panelists’ insights and expertise; but the dynamics of the session can also benefit the panelists’ understanding of how journalism works -- a combination that should prove beneficial to the recipients of what’s channeled through the often-complex medical-news dissemination process.

 

I will report back in a future post after the conference about how things went.

 
About the Author

Eric T. Rosenthal
Eric T. Rosenthal has spent more than 40 years in journalism and academic public affairs, more than half of them involved in the cancer community. He has received several journalism awards as Special Correspondent for Oncology Times, and helped organize two national conferences dealing with medicine and the media.

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